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Sustainable Forestry Practices for PEI: Compatible Ideas from Europe

Forestry has been a significant industry on PEI for centuries. The vast majority of woodland on PEI is owned by thousands of private small landowners (unlike vast tracts of Crown land on mainland Canada), making it comparable to European style forestry. To foster greater awareness of sustainable forestry practices, deepen understanding of how climate change could affect forestry management, and encourage more woodlot owners to become engaged with their association, the PEI Woodlot Owners Association (PEIWOA) and the UPEI Climate Research Lab will host a public talk on November 20th at 7:00 p.m. at the University of Prince Edward Island, McDougall Hall Lecture Theatre 242. Dutch expert Gert-Jan Nabuurs will highlight his comparison of European style forestry to the situation in PEI with ideas about using wood chips for our local heating market. This event is free of charge and open to the public.

For more information, visit the PEI Woodlot Owners Association website at www.peiwoa.ca and the UPEI Climate Research Lab website at www.upei.ca/climate

Dr. Gert-Jan Nabuurs is currently professor European forest resources at Wageningen University in the Netherlands and senior researcher at Wageningen Environmental Research, WUR. His background is in European-scale forest resource analyses, and management under climate change. He is currently Coordinating Lead Author in Good Practice Guidance for IPCC and will lead the Agriculture and Forestry chapter in the IPCC 6AR, starting 2019. Formerly Assistant Director of the European Forest Institute in Finland from 2009-2012, Prof Nabuurs is member of Ministerial Advisory Committee Sustainability of Biomass for Energy Purposes, advising on certification schemes and their applicability to Dutch biomass sustainability criteria.

Although this event is important for woodlot owners and silviculture workers, Prof Nabuurs’ ideas and broad experience will also be of interest to forestry contractors, environment and watershed groups, climate scientists, resource managers, local governments and Chambers of Commerce. All are welcome.

For further information, visit the PEI Woodlot Owners Association website at www.peiwoa.ca and the UPEI Climate Research Lab website at www.upei.ca/climate .

 

Newsletter July 2018

 

NEWSLETTER INTRODUCTION

Welcome to third edition of the Prince Edward Island Woodlot Owners Association (PEIWOA) 2018 Newsletter. The intent of these newsletters is to provide PEIWOA members with a summary of forestry and forest-related issues, opportunities, and happenings throughout PEI and the Atlantic region.

The PEIWOA is a new organization developed for Woodlot owners on Prince Edward Island. The Association is an inclusive group of woodlot owners that encourages Islanders to create a more sustainable forest ecosystem and forest resource on PEI. We thank all members for supporting this new initiative and hope that together we can continue to grow this group with a goal of enhancing the forest economy and forest industry of the Island. PEI woodlot owners have a large role to play on the Island and we are committed to being a voice for all concerns of members at a provincial and regional level.

Sincerely,

PEIWOA

 

CHAIRMAN’S MESSAGE

Greetings from the Board of the PEIWOA. “Welcome” to our third newsletter this year.

We would like you to consider volunteering for the Board of the PEIWOA as we have a yearly turnover of members. It is only for a two year term as we want to provide continuity for the Board. We have three representatives from each County. We learn something new at every meeting. We are always looking for suggestions and feedback from our members any time.

You may contact myself at rowe@pei.sympatico.ca or call 902-940-1933. You may also reach us through the website at www.peiwoa.ca or the email or Facebook contact

Thanks.

John J. Rowe; Chairman – PEIWOA

 

My History with Trees

Contributed by: Jean Maki PEI Woodlot Owner member)

My History with Trees

I grew up near the south shore of Lake Superior and my playground was the woods that surrounded my home. One of my earliest memories is visiting my grandfather’s logging camp where he used horses to remove the trees. And another memory is building a fort with logs from my grandfather’s pulp wood pile (which he didn’t appreciate).

At the age of 25, four years after coming to PEI, I bought a property on the Selkirk Road near Iona that included 110 acres of woods. Since I heated solely with wood I had to learn how to use a chainsaw—which in those days were much heavier than today’s models and didn’t have the safety features. Through the woodlot improvement program at the time, I was able to hire friends who had a horse logging business to do work in the woods and then was able to get a road built. The most memorable tree was an Eastern Hemlock that 2 people weren’t able to reach their arms around.   Just as important as the firewood and saw logs that I got from the woods was the pleasure of walking through it on a regular basis. To this day it’s an activity I thoroughly enjoy.

Let’s fast forward to 2004 when I returned to PEI after a 16-year absence.   I lived in Charlottetown at first (having sold my farm years earlier), but within a year I purchased 50 acres of woods on the Iona Road and spent a lot of time there camping with my rabbit and cat, finding boundary lines, and cutting firewood for my fireplace insert—hauling it to Ch’town in my van. I signed up with the woodlot improvement program again and started thinning various areas that had a lot of dying balsam fir. This woodlot has a stream through it and some lovely Eastern hemlock, white pine, Red spruce, and Yellow birch.

My love of the country and trees took me back to the Selkirk Road (not far from my first property) to live in 2008 for 8 years and more recently I’ve added another woodlot. Having the good fortune of living near Macphail Woods, I have been able to participate in various workshops and a weeklong course which helped me to learn how to take better care of the woods. Over the years I’ve been planting some species that are not found in my woods including Red oak, White ash, Eastern cedar, Larch and additional Eastern hemlock and White pine. I’m also planting some native shrubs such as Witch hazel and Hobblebush and am just starting to

 

add different ferns and wildflowers.

 

During a walk through my Selkirk woodlot with Victor MacLeod a couple of years ago for the Forest Enhancement Program, I was surprised and saddened to hear that my woodlot was in the top 5% of Island woodlots. Saddened because I thought there would be many that were much better. One of the reasons I bought the woodlots was to prevent them from being clear cut in areas that still had large tracts of woods which is so important for wildlife.   When I returned to PEI in 2004 it was shocking to see how much clearcutting had taken place.

Last year I spent a lot of time trying to find the boundary lines which were badly overgrown on my Selkirk property.   In the course of spending so much time going through areas off the road I was able to see a great number of birds I had never seen there before.   One bird that I often heard and sometimes saw is now very rare and that is the Barred Owl. I wonder if the clearcutting that has been going on nearby has anything to do with it. But on the bright side, I heard a Saw Whet Owl last summer.

 

What I would like to see happen to my two woodlots in the future is to have them in some kind of trust where they will be protected and cared for so wildlife will continue to have a home and people will be able to enjoy walking through them.   I feel extremely fortunate to have been a caretaker of these various woodlots and will continue to do so as long as I can.

Jeanne Maki

 

 

 

 

 

Photos were provided by Jeanne Maki

 

 

                        

Havenloft Tree Nursery

 

Imagine an entirely new innovative type of investment. That promotes an environmentally friendly and sustainable product. If you could grow your own gold, would you?        One of my favorite quotes is “The best time to plant a black walnut was twenty years ago. The second best time is now.”   This is because walnuts trees can be grown for the purpose of Veneer and timber as a high quality wood product. You can get up to 20% quality veneer per 400 trees an acre. This is with proper care and maintenance over a 30 year cycle for average trees.  Upon maturity, these trees can range from $1000 (non-veneer timber) or even up to $5000 for veneer quality per tree. Better maintenance and care over the lifespan of an orchard can increase these numbers further. This could mean at the low end up to quarter million an acre in timber.            A walnut orchard can take several years to come into full production, but in turn can produce up to 3000lbs of nuts per acre in 5-7 years with amounts only increasing. This can be either resold to companies for a consumer food product or resold directly to farmer’s bulk as feed. As of now research has shown that companies are selling in shell black walnuts on average for about $5 lbs.       Seedlings can be sold in local storefront nurseries, farmers markets, online worldwide or in bulk to other nurseries across Canada.  They can be grown and sold either as bare root or containerized. Nurseries sell out quickly of this tree, with no mass production in effect in Atlantic Canada. While other companies experience product depreciation, this product will appreciate in value if unsold in the first year. Prices start at $20 for one-year-old trees, while two-to-three year trees can be $40 to $60 each, depending on size.        My goal is to sell these trees to those who can benefit from them. Be it a farmer who is reclaiming unused land for their retirement or creating a new kind of permaculture pasture. A landowner with acreage they want to get more value from, as walnut orchards increase land value. Even a savvy investor who can see the value in such a high rate of return and want to purchase land to have these trees planted. Additional revenue can be brought in by providing pruning services, planting services and general maintenance, as well as eventually nut production.  Selling increasingly popular hull waste to organic produce companies for medicinal and weed control purposes, as black walnut produce a potent herbicide and dye used in many hair products and an organic abrasive alternative from the ground up shells, instead of sand.     The ability to have secondary products such as English walnut or filberts, even more exotic to Pei fruit trees like peach and pear. By specializing on black walnuts we enter into a market that has only existed in a small portion of central Ontario. While the investing aspect has been something only hobby farms have tried.      There are many other benefits of growing black walnuts on PEI. Black walnuts are in the top ten carbon sink trees.  We could Reforest unused farm land and reduce our dependency on the American walnut and timber industry. Plus there is no need for yearly replanting, watershed concerns or pesticide.       As this would be the one of the first large scale commercial walnut production facilities in Canada, it will bring a new and exciting opportunity for Islanders and investors worldwide. This is the chance to get ahead of a new and exciting market opportunity, the best time to Invest is now.  Please check out our Kick starter at https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/havenlofttreenursery/adopt-a-black-walnut-tree-get-some-nuts?ref=discovery or check us out online at www.havenlofttreenursery.com.
Eastern Chamber of Commerce Promotes Resource Development!

Recognizing that our primary resources have always been the mainstays of our economy, the EPEICC has been looking for new ways to increase development. We started thinking about the “forestry sector”, as we have more woodland in the east than the rest of the Island combined, and much is underutilized, says Board Member, Pat Binns.

 

To get the ball rolling, Chamber Directors sponsored a meeting in January with a small group of woodlot owners to discuss ideas which would might bring more value to our woodlots. While the discussions recognized the continuing low prices and obstacles to development, some great ideas were discussed. Most were interested in “biomass heating systems” and their potential, especially if small woodlot owners, using sustainable harvest methods, were used. The new District system in Tignish was highlighted as were other projects in Summerside and Charlottetown. As there are few biomass installations in the east, follow up was agreed upon.

 

Other ideas promoted included the following: * nut trees plantations such as black walnuts, hazelnuts and pecans. * non-timbered forest products including sugar maple * small mill opportunities for hardwood flooring and live edging products. * agroforestry opportunities such as using willow extracts for medicinal purposes * more milling capacity and kiln drying * studying European small-scale forestry practice.

 

Participants generally agreed that a Marketing Structure that supported the small woodlot owner would enable owners to generate more income and expand sustainable activity. As a result, next steps include looking at the potential for a woodlot owner’s cooperative or similar structure.

 

Discussions on the biomass opportunity have continued. The Town of Montague, along with their Economic Development group is doing a feasibility study on using biomass heat for municipal, Government, community and commercial facilities. A project is in early stage consideration for the Belfast area and interest is also being shown in the Souris area.

 

Russ Compton, the current President of the Chamber, and a long time woodlot owner, urged anyone interested in a marketing structure controlled by woodlot owners, to contact the Chamber office or the PEI Woodlot Owners Association. A follow-up meeting will be held in the near future.

 

Facebook: PEI Woodlot Owners Association

https://www.facebook.com/PEI-Woodlot-Owners-Association-245012399166879/

Thank you on behalf of the board of the Prince Edward Island Woodlot Owners Association (PEIWOA) for your support. The board continues to represent your interests to the government and Industry to add resources for you to manage your woodlots.  Your continued support will enable the PEIWOA to grow and move forward. The simplest way to provide support is to renew your membership. The regular annual fee is $25.00 or you can opt for a 2 year membership for $40.00.

PEI Federation of Agriculture members can join for 2 years for $20.00

 

Your prompt response will allow the board to plan events to meet your needs in future years. Please also encourage other woodlot owners to join so we can help even more people to add value to their woodlands.

 

Check out our Facebook page (PEI Woodlot Owners Association) and our website (http://www.peiwoa.ca/) for current and upcoming events.

 

Sincerely,

James MacDonald, Membership Secretary PEIWOA.

 

YOU CAN SEND YOUR CHEQUE TO:

PEI WOODLOT OWNERS ASSN.

81 PRINCE STREET,

CHARLOTTETOWN C1A 4R3

 

 

Name: ______________________________________   I have Woodlots in Kings County (   )

Queens County (   )

Address:_________________________________                                     Prince County (   )

 

___________________________________________       I am interested in being a director (   )                        

 

Phone: ________________________________               PAYMENT $25     1year (   ) $40   2 year   (   )

 

Email: __________________________________

 

(Office use only   date received _____________ date receipt issued ______________ Date Membership card issued ____________)

 

 

 

April 2018 Newsletter

 

NEWSLETTER INTRODUCTION

Welcome to second edition of the Prince Edward Island Woodlot Owners Association (PEIWOA) 2018 Newsletter. The intent of these quarterly newsletters is to provide PEIWOA members with a summary of forestry and forest-related issues, opportunities, and happenings throughout PEI and the Atlantic region.

The PEIWOA is a new organization developed for Woodlot owners on Prince Edward Island. The Association is an inclusive group of woodlot owners that encourages Islanders to create a more sustainable forest ecosystem and forest resource on PEI. We thank all members for supporting this new initiative and hope that together we can continue to grow this group with a goal of enhancing the forest economy and forest industry of the Island. PEI woodlot owners have a large role to play on the Island and we are committed to being a voice for all concerns of members at a provincial and regional level.

Sincerely,

PEIWOA

 

CHAIRMAN’S MESSAGE

Greetings from the Board of the PEIWOA. “Welcome” to our second newsletter this year. Just a short message this month as you are all invited to the Annual Meeting and Workshop on April 14th at the Tracadie Cross Community Center. Please be sure to come as we have a very interesting lineup of presenters on the agenda. I will have a summary of the year’s activities at the Annual Meeting.   Please let us know if you will be attending as we need numbers for the meal at noon hour.

There has been a lot of discussion recently about the National Building Code being implemented across the Island in the next year or two. We have been in discussion with the PEI government to encourage some exemptions for rural areas. We will have an update on our progress. We will also have presenters enlighten us on the legal rights of woodlot owners on PEI. Most people are not aware of their rights as landowners and the necessity of posting our land if we don’t want uninvited guests. We will also have presenters from the Climate Lab at UPEI  — bringing us up to date on the effects of climate change on our woodlots. They will also tell us what we can do about it if we want to build a sustainable forest for PEI far into the future — for our grand-kids or future generations.

We would like you to consider volunteering for the Board of the PEIWOA as we have a yearly turnover of members. It is only for a two year term as we want to provide continuity for the Board. We have three representatives from each County. We learn something new at every meeting. We are always looking for suggestions and feedback from our members any time.

Please let us know by April 5th if you plan to attend our workshop. We will also have an opportunity to tour a well managed local woodlot in the afternoon – after the meeting (weather permitting). You may contact myself at rowe@pei.sympatico.ca or call 902-940-1933. You may also reach us through the website at www.peiwoa.ca or the email or Facebook contact. Come — bring a neighbor woodlot owner – and let us know so we can enjoy a lunch as well.

Thanks.

John J. Rowe; Chairman – PEIWOA

 

Getting to Know Our Common Forest Birds

Contributed by: Julie-Lynn Zahavich (Stewardship Coordinator, Island Nature Trust)

Island Nature Trust (INT) is a non-profit organization that protects and manages land across the province. Much of the land INT owns is forested but, until recently, we had very little information about the forest bird community using those forests.

In 2017, Island Nature Trust began an intensive study of the bird communities using forests in INT natural areas and the habitat features important for forest-nesting species at risk. INT staff members conducted early morning point count surveys in six natural areas, located across the island, at 30 distinct locations. During our surveys, all species heard or seen were recorded.

Over the next few months (and newsletters), we will be sharing results from the first year of our Forest Bird Program. To begin, we thought we would familiarize everyone with our most common forest birds. The following species were the 10 most commonly detected during our 2017 surveys. Grab your bird book and follow along, and look and listen for these species next time you are in the woods! If you are interested, there are also phone apps available with all of these birds’ calls, to help ID those that like to sing from the top of the forest canopy.

  1. American Robin (Turdus migratorius) was detected at every point count location. Not surprisingly, Robins are known as habitat generalists meaning you can find them pretty much anywhere! Robins typically build their nests on horizontal branches in the bottom half of trees, but they are not picky and have been known to nest in gutters, eaves, and other outdoor structures. Their song is often described as “cheerily, cheer up, cheer up, cheerily, cheer up”.
  2. Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) was detected at 29 of 30 point count locations. Red-eyed Vireos build their cup-shaped nests in forks of tree branches. Breeding males will sing constantly, with one male known to have vocalized over 20,000 times in one day. Their song is a series of short phrases with distinct pauses in between: “look-up, way-up, tree-top, see-me, here I am”.
  3. Black-throated Green Warbler (Setophaga virens) was detected at 26 of 30 point count locations. The Black-throated Green Warbler builds a cup-shaped nest in the forks of tree branches using moss, lichens, twigs, bark, spider webs, and grass. Males sing a persistent “zoo-zee, zoo-zoo-zee” during the breeding season.

 

  1. Northern Parula (Setophaga americana) was detected at 25 of 30 point count locations. Northern Parulas eat a wide variety of insects. They are often associated with mosses and lichens, which they use to build their hanging nests. Their song is a rising buzzy trill with a final sharp note.

                                            

  1. Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapillus) was detected at 24 of 30 point count locations. The Ovenbird gets its name from the domed nest it builds on the ground, which resembles a Dutch oven. Their song is a loud “tea-Cher, tea-Cher, tea-CHER, Tea-CHER, TEA-CHER” that rings throughout the forest.

 

 

  1. Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) was detected at 24 of 30 point count locations. Black-capped Chickadees, also called the Cheeseburger bird by many, are well-known among bird watchers and feeders. These hardy little birds stick around PEI all winter. They are found in all types of habitats and eat a variety of food, from seeds to insects. Chickadees place their nests within tree cavities that they excavate themselves. Their song is often described as “cheese-bur-ger”, and their familiar call is a clear “chick-a-dee-dee-dee”.
  2. American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) was detected at 23 of 30 point count locations. Crows are often thought of as urban birds, but they are also common in all types of woodland. Crows form large family groups, and older offspring help to raise new young. Crows will eat just about anything, and build their stick nests in crotches of trees near the trunk. Their call is a loud “caw”.
  3. Golden-crowned Kinglet (Regulus satrapa) was detected at 19 of 30 point count locations. Golden-crowned Kinglets are small but tough—they stick around PEI all year long! They create small cup-shaped nests high up in trees and close to the trunk. Nests are lined with mosses and lichens. The Golden-crowned Kinglet’s song consists of a series of “tsee” notes that gradually get faster and higher-pitched.
  4. Hermit Thrush (Catharus guttatus) was detected at 18 of 30 point count locations. They often nest on the ground, hidden under overhanging branches or protected by low vegetation. Hermit Thrushes are noted for their beautiful song which is a series of long, clear, musical phrases, each on a different pitch.

 

  1. Black-and-white Warbler (Mniotilta varia) was detected at 18 of 30 point count locations. Black-and-white Warblers eat mostly insects that they forage for under tree bark. They build their nests on the ground near the base of a tree or log. Nests are cup-shaped and constructed with dry leaves, tree needles, and grass, and lined with soft materials like moss and feathers. Black-and-white Warblers have a high-pitched “weesy, weesy, weesy” song that sounds like a squeaky wheel.

If you would like to receive updates on INT’s Forest Bird Program, please contact Julie-Lynn at julielynn@islandnaturetrust.ca or call 902-892-7513. Photos included were provided by Donna Martin and Brett MacKinnon

Climate Change and the Forestry Sector

Stephanie Arnold and Adam Fenech

January 30, 2018

Forests are an important resource. Not only are they a home for plants and animals, they are also a source of timber, food, and medicine. Forests also act as natural carbon sinks, support socio-economic activities, provide cultural services, conserve biodiversity, control flood and erosion, filter water, regulate climate and atmospheric composition [1], and conserve anadramous fish and other wetland species.

Across Canada, only 6% of forest land is privately owned; the rest are owned by the federal, provincial, or territorial governments [2]. On Prince Edward Island, however, over 86% of forest land is privately owned by approximately 16,000 individuals and organizations [3]. Land clearing created fragmented small woodlots from large contiguous forest. Out of the Island’s 1.4 million acres of land, approximately 0.62 million acres of it is forest land.

Figure 1: Distribution of forest land in 2010. [4]

 

Climate Change Impacts

Climate change will bring about warmer weather, changes in precipitation patterns, more intense storms, and rising sea levels in Prince Edward Island.

Opportunities

Warmer temperatures could increase forest productivity, lengthen growing seasons [5], add growing degree days for some hardwood species, and expand suitable habitat for others [6].

The sector could also benefit from regulations put in place to limit greenhouse gas emissions. This could encourage better forest management as it would give owners financial incentive to sequester more carbon with their lands.

Challenges

Warmer temperatures could shift the suitable range for cold-hard species such as white spruce, balsam fir, and white birch northward in search for cooler temperatures [7, 8]; increase the productivity and expand the range of pests (e.g., bark beetle) and pathogens that are currently limited by winter temperatures, leading to an increase in the range and severity of diseases and pest outbreaks [9]; result in an earlier start to the growing season, increasing frost exposure for plants [10]; shorten the winter soil water recharge period [11]; and intensify water stress from increased evapotranspiration [12].

Figure 2: The current and potential range of white spruce using the CSIRO model and A2 scenario. Green represents the core range of the species; brown represents the extremes of the range of the species; and white represents areas outside the range of the specie [13]

Changes in precipitation patterns could increase the frequency of drought-like conditions and limit migration of tree species from the south if local soil properties do not suit (e.g., dryer soils from changing precipitation patterns).

Extreme weather events such as windstorms and ice storms could increase damage to public forest land and private woodlots [14]. Increasing frequency and impact of storm surge and coastal flooding could inundate and kill trees. Intense rain storms could cause inundation of trees in areas where the water cannot drain away.

There are two noteworthy characteristics of the sector that multiplies the challenges posed by the climate change impacts discussed above. First, there is a general lack of awareness among the general public of the services that forests provide. As a result, there is less attention paid and fewer resources allocated to the monitoring, research, and reduction of the detrimental impacts caused by climate change in this sector. Second, fragmentation makes it more challenging to coordinate a sector-wide response to climate change impacts.

Adaptation Actions

The UPEI Climate Research Lab developed the Prince Edward Island Climate Change Adaptation Recommendations Report, which outlines anticipated climate change impacts for 10 different sectors – Agriculture, Education and Outreach, Energy, Fish and Aquaculture, Forestry and Biodiversity, Insurance, Properties and Infrastructure, Public Health and Safety, Tourism, and Water – and recommends a total of 97 adaptation actions to address them. This was done with the help of input collected from online submissions, public meetings, and consultations with over 70 sectoral stakeholders, including woodlot owners and members of the PEIWOA. The Government of Prince Edward Island will be using this Report in the development of its upcoming Climate Change Action Plan. Below are highlights some adaptation actions recommended for the forestry sector.

Recommended Adaptation Action Suggested Timeline
Form a foundation for evidence-based adaptation planning by conducting research and collecting data (e.g., forecast precipitation patterns, conduct vulnerability assessments for key species, develop comprehensive invasive species management strategy). Short-term (0 to 5 years)
Keep forests healthy and productive and by reducing non-climatic stressors (e.g., reduce pollution, promote development of ground cover, limit overharvesting). Short- to medium-term (0 to 10 years)
Increase natural areas to sustain enough suitable habitats for diverse and healthy populations, particularly where natural connectivity is lacking, biodiversity is under threat, and future species may thrive (e.g., plant trees that are suitable under future climate, restore abandoned agricultural fields, sell tree saplings as school fundraisers). Medium- to long-term (6+ years)
Promote needed adaptation where existing incentive is lacking by using regulatory frameworks (e.g., widen the watercourse and wetland buffer zone). Increase compliance with added enforcement efforts and stricter penalties. Short-term (0 to 5 years)
Demonstrate the importance of forestry and biodiversity conservation and enhancement initiatives by assigning an economic value to the ecosystem services they provide (e.g., pollination and carbon storage services). These benefits and their economic values should be highlighted when generating support for adaptation actions in the sector. Short-term (0 to 5 years)
Generate additional support for adaptation actions by engaging in outreach (e.g., frame the benefits of forests and biodiversity in ways that resonate with the public). Short-term (0 to 5 years)
Improve the efficiency and effectiveness of adaptation activities by connecting with other environmental groups, community groups, and sectors (e.g., coordinated habitat restoration for Fish and Aquaculture and Forestry and Biodiversity sectors). Ongoing
Collaborate with local Indigenous groups to incorporate Traditional Ecological Knowledge. Short-term (0 to 5 years)
Increase capacity within the government (e.g., dedicate more staff to outreach) Short- to medium-term (0 to 10 years)
Develop a coordinated approach to implement the Recommended Adaptation Actions for the sector (e.g., stakeholder meetings, onsite demonstrations). Ongoing

Gradual and incremental changes to the status quo alone will be insufficient in the face of future climate. Meaningful and successful climate change adaptation for the Island will require coordinated, collaborative, complementary, and parallel approaches by the different leads and collaborators (e.g., woodlot owners, sector, experts , public, and governments). To achieve this, a clear vision of sustainability, the willingness to disrupt the status quo, a commitment to work together, and the urgency to act swiftly are needed from everyone. Planned adaptation takes time and the work must begin immediately. It is insufficient to “prioritize” climate change adaptation; adapting to climate change must be considered a normal way of life.

References

[1] Bourque, C. P.A. and Q.K. Hassan. (2010). Modelled Potential Tree Species Distribution for Current and Projected Future Climate for Prince Edward Island, Canada. Submitted to Prince Edward Island, Department of Environment, Energy and Forestry. Retrieved from https://www.princeedwardisland.ca/sites/default/files/publications/climate_change_2010._pei_full_report.pdf

[2] Natural Resources Canada. (n.d.). Forest land ownership. Retrieved from http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/forests/canada/ownership/17495

[3] Dunsky Energy Consulting. (2017, March). Recommendations for the Development of a Climate Change Mitigation Strategy. Submitted to Prince Edward Island, Department of Communities, Land and Environment. Retrieved from https://www.princeedwardisland.ca/sites/default/files/publications/pei_climate_change_mitigation_recommendations.pdf

[4] Arnold, S. and A. Fenech. (2017, October). Prince Edward Island Climate Change Adaptation Recommendations Report. University of Prince Edward Island Climate Lab. Charlottetown, Canada. Report submitted to the Prince Department of Communities, Land and Environment, Government of Prince Edward Island, 172p.

[5] Nantel, P., M.G. Pellatt, K. Keenleyside, and P.A. Gray. (2014). Biodiversity and Protected Areas. In: Canada in a Changing Climate: Sector Perspectives on Impacts and Adaptation, (eds.) F.J. Warren and D.S. Lemmen; Government of Canada, Ottawa, ON, p. 159-190.

[6] Bourque and Hassan, 2010

[7] Bourque and Hassan, 2010

[8] Nantel et al., 2014

[9] Nantel et al., 2014

[10] Nantel et al., 2014

[11] Glen, B. (2008). Climate Change and its Potential Effects on the Trees of the Prince Edward Island National Park.

[12] National Fish, Wildlife and Plants Climate Adaptation Partnership. (2012). National Fish, Wildlife and Plants Climate Adaptation Strategy. Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, Council on Environmental Quality, Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Washington, DC. Retrieved from https://www.wildlifeadaptationstrategy.gov/pdf/NFWPCAS-Final.pdf

[13] Glen, 2008

[14] Nantel et al., 2014

 

An Important Link in the Forest Management Chain

By Sid Watts

As a woodlot owner, who cares very much about the forest, it’s so important to be able to sell some products from time to time. After all, “management” of the forest quite literally means that some trees will be cut in order to promote the growth of trees and create conditions that we desire. Through the past few decades of owning a woodlot my one barrier to doing good management has been the ability to sell small quantities of good logs. Over the years, sawmill after sawmill closed its doors on the Island and our management of our forest had become much more a commodity style of management.

It appears that there is a new generation of folks who want to turn that around and the small family owned sawmills seem to be taking root.   One such mill is Timber Koke’s Mill in Brooklyn.

I’m excited because it is right next door to me but even if it wasn’t, it is an important new mill for Eastern PEI. The mill is owned and operated by a young couple, Ashley and Cody Koke. It is so wonderful to see a young couple with a young family, see a niche in the marketplace and start out on a venture like this.   It is a gamble of sorts but what business venture isn’t a gamble. But from what I have seen, they are making this less of a gamble and more of a well thought out business venture and they are determined to make it work.

By having a focus on custom sawing and producing niche products they are not competing, as much, with commodity lumber.   They are there as much to provide a service as to provide a product. The service they provide is to give their customers what they want and customers are getting what they want! Anything from 20 foot or longer custom beams, to live edge lumber for furniture, mantles or counter tops, to laths and other lobster trap materials can all be made at this mill. They even go out of their way to make the trap material out of the species of wood desired by a buyer.

 

 

 

“We are currently sawing some very large pine into live edge heavy planks for a customer.” Ashley said.   “These will be turned into furniture and everyone wins. Even the metal legs for some of the tables are made locally, so the spin-off is tremendous.”

Why are small sawmills such an important link to promote good forest management? It’s quite simple actually. It’s because they give woodlot owners, who are managing for higher value not higher volume, a place to sell a few good logs.   As Ashley said “We will even buy one log. We want to be part of the community and do our part to help out others.” They have a small truck and loader and are able to pick up smaller quantities of logs. “We know we have to do things that the bigger mills simple can’t do.” Knowing that there is a market for our future logs, both hardwood and softwood, make the management of a small woodlot much more practical.   For me personally, it means that I no longer have to cut potential logs into firewood, simply because I have nowhere to sell them.   Now the log that comes off my trees that I am cutting for fire wood can go to a higher value use.   Over time, the quality of logs in my woodlot will get better and better and be worth more. This will lead to even better management of the resource. As more woodlot owners become familiar with the small mills near to them and what they are looking for then we will all see improvements in the quality of PEI’s forests.

There is a strong desire across PEI to apply good forest management. Some of the management techniques for higher value logs are often slower and more labour intensive. There is a need for some cash flow to support good management for higher value.   Being able to sell small quantities of logs is a huge benefit to woodlot owners and will lead to more owners getting involved. Another benefit to having small custom sawmills is the additional people who will be making a living or at least getting some supplemental income from the forest. As woodlot owners, we need to support our small local mills by doing what we can to keep them supplied with what they need and in turn they will help us do a better job of managing our precious resource.

 

 

 

 

Facebook: PEI Woodlot Owners Association

https://www.facebook.com/PEI-Woodlot-Owners-Association-245012399166879/

PEIWOA 2018 Annual Meeting

The Annual Meeting and Workshop for the PEI Woodlot Owners Association will be held on Saturday, April 14th, at the Tracadie Cross Community Center with registration to begin at 8:30am and the meeting to begin at 9:00 am.

We have an interesting agenda that will include speakers on varied topics:

Implementation of the National Building Code on PEI;

Effects of Climate Change on PEI Forests;

Building a Sustainable Woodlot Industry for PEI;

Woodlots and Watersheds; etc.

Lunch will be provided.

This  workshop is free and open to all woodlot owners on PEI.

We have a tour of a managed woodlot planned for the afternoon.

Please rsvp before  April 2nd so we have numbers for the meal.

Contact  John J. Rowe; Chairman of PEIWOA at rowe@pei.sympatico.ca  or peiwoodlotowners@gmail.com

January 2018 Newsletter

 

NEWSLETTER INTRODUCTION

Welcome to first edition of the Prince Edward Island Woodlot Owners Association (PEIWOA) 2018 Newsletter. The intent of these quarterly newsletters is to provide PEIWOA members with a summary of forestry and forest-related issues, opportunities, and happenings throughout PEI and the Atlantic region.

The PEIWOA is a new organization developed for Woodlot owners on Prince Edward Island. The Association is an inclusive group of woodlot owners that encourages Islanders to create a more sustainable forest ecosystem and forest resource on PEI. We thank all members for supporting this new initiative and hope that together we can continue to grow this group with a goal of enhancing the forest economy and forest industry of the Island. PEI woodlot owners have a large role to play on the Island and we are committed to being a voice for all concerns of members at a provincial and regional level.

Sincerely,

PEIWOA

 

CHAIRMAN’S MESSAGE

January Report — 2018 – PEI Woodlot Owners Association

“Happy New Year” to all from the Board of Directors of the PEIWOA. Welcome to the first newsletter of 2018. We aim to publish three or four during the fiscal year and welcome articles from anyone who would like to write on a timely topic for the woodlot community.

We are in the planning stages of setting up an advisory group to work with our new Minister of Communities, Land and Environment — the Hon. Richard Brown. We hope it will include individuals from watershed groups; woodlot owners; and members from government departments like forestry and environment. There are a number of issues that we feel are important to the woodlot owners of PEI and we want to work with everyone to improve our industry and the environment.

During the month of December, we had an opportunity to meet with our Members of Parliament          — representing PEI in Ottawa – and briefed them on proposals that are now before parliament that were presented by the Canadian Federation of Woodlot Owners (CFWO) – of which we are a member. We hope to be included in the Low Carbon Economy Fund later this spring which will allow us to double the amount of trees planted and increase the amount of silviculture work in each province. We also had an opportunity to discuss these issues with the new chair of the Senate Standing Committee for Agriculture and Forestry — Senator Diane Griffen . It is fortuitous that Senator Griffen has been appointed Chair of the Standing Committee following our recent submission back in October.

We plan to have a presence during the 2018 Winter Woodlot Tour which will be held the last Saturday in January – weather permitting. Please find the details elsewhere in this newsletter and plan to join us — if possible.

 

Please renew your membership at your earliest convenience — either online or by mail – and continue to promote our association to your friends and neighbors and fellow woodlot owners. We are always looking for members who would like to volunteer to serve on the Board. Don’t hesitate to get involved; the future of woodland on PEI is in your hands.   John J. Rowe; Chairman — PEIWOA

Chairman:  John J. Rowe

 

 

 

 

 

Red Maple – A True Success story

As John D. Rockefeller said, “The secret of success is doing the common things uncommonly well.”, and that pretty much describes our ordinary red maple.

Growing from Florida north to Newfoundland and west to Manitoba, red maple (A rubrum) is a common tree throughout its range because it will grow on dry or wet sites and at all elevations. On PEI, it is often known as swamp maple or soft maple and it can be found in virtually every stand type given its ability to thrive under an amazing variety of conditions. Living as long as 125 years, it can reach heights of 20m+ and diameters of 75cm.

Red Maple produces large volumes of seed that germinate well on mineral soils or light litter. Most of the seed will germinate in the first year and seedlings will do well in partial cuts with some shade but also more exposed areas in larger cuts. Planting red maple on grassed sites requires protection from browsing mammals and harsh dry winter conditions for best results. Red maple stumps sprout aggressively after a harvest and can suppress or kill competing tree seedlings.

Red maple is most commonly used for fuelwood providing good heat value in the fall and spring months. It is also suitable for maple syrup production but the sugar to sap ratio is much lower than its more famous cousin the Sugar Maple. Unlike most other hardwoods, most red maple boards are sawn from the lighter sapwood rather than the darker reddish-brown heartwood and on occasion, red maple wood can have a curly grain pattern.

In terms of wildlife, red maple seeds are usually plentiful and an important food source for many birds and mammals. Red maple is also a vital part of our autumn landscape providing magnificent deep scarlet and rich crimson displays beside the oranges and yellows of other Island tree species.

 

Red Maple Silvics:

Height: 20 m+                                                   Diameter: 75 cm +                           Age: 125 years Shade Tolerance:                                             Moderate to High Soil Preference:                                                Wide range Climate Change Adaptability Potential:   Good

 

 

The Three R’s of Climate Change

The word “stand” is used frequently when talking about forests and woodlands. In general terms, a stand is a forest area that is distinct from the areas the around it. Stands may be determined by biological factors such as species, age, size, and health and influenced by other non-biotic factors such as soil type, nutrient, drainage, slope, location, history and exposure.

Dividing the forest into smaller areas with similar characteristics has been used by foresters for centuries to focus management activities and produce more and/or higher quality forest products. The same process can be used to help land owners manage forest lands for goals such as recreation or wildlife habitat. But possibly the most important benefit of stand identification in the coming decades will be helping land owners adapt to the implications of Climate Change.

Each stand has its own strengths and limitations in terms of its ability to adapt to climate change. By understanding the various elements of each stand, land owners can adapt their management strategies and set realistic climate change goals. When setting your forest management priorities, it is best to keep the three R’s – Resistance, Resilience and Response – in mind.

Resistance: Means helping the existing stands strengthen their natural defenses against anticipated changes

Resilience: Means helping suitable stands to adapt to some degree of change. Encourage the forest to return to natural conditions after a disturbance through natural renewal or planting.

Reaction: Means accepting that some things will change regardless of what you do or don’t do. In many cases you may have to let nature to take its course while accommodating changes and supporting the ecosystem’s ability to adapt.

There are no magic bullets to solve climate change forest-related issues but you can build capacity by considering your options and developing a plan of action that reflects the current condition of each stand and helping your forest meet its climate change potential.

 

Eastern White Pine

Historically Eastern White Pine (Pinus strobus) was found in most areas of Prince Edward Island but today it is most common in eastern areas of the province. In the original forest, it was renowned for its diameter (100 cm+) and height (25-30m) and for its strength and flexibility because these characteristics made it perfect for masts on large ocean-going warships.

Today, white pine is valued for fine furniture lumber and paneling. When freshly cut, white pine wood has a creamy white colour but as it ages, it will often take on darker golden tones with striking yellowish or reddish-brown hues sometimes known as “pumpkin pine”. While the way these characteristics develop is not fully understood, it is most common in older pines but genetics and soil nutrients may also be contributing factors.

The size and quality of white pine found on PEI today is a far cry from those of earlier times. This decline in quality can be attributed many different influences but high grading (taking the best and leaving the rest) and the impacts of the White Pine Weevil are the major contributing factors. White pine is a major component of PEI’s tree improvement program and real gains in growth and form in planting stock have been achieved over the last few decades.

White pine may be planted in open plantations but it needs a measure of protection from harsh winter winds and salt spray. The White Pine Weevil can cause problems infestations in plantations but once the crowns close and the trees reach 5 – 8 m the level of infestation usually drops off significantly. In many cases, the poorest trees will be removed from the plantation during the first few thinning operations leaving the largest and straightest trees to grow. Weevil damage is often minimal where the trees grow in about 50% shade as this is similar to how white pine renews itself naturally.

White pine seeds are an important food source for many small mammals and birds. Bald eagles prefer to build their nests in tall, old white pine trees and other species will perch on the tree’s large branches to scout for prey. Cavities in large trees are also valued for dens and nests.

White Pine Silvics:

Height: 30m+                                                     Diameter: 1m +                 Age: 250 years or more Shade Tolerance:                                             Moderate                           Soil Preference:                                                Wide range but prefers sandy loams Climate Change Adaptability Potential :  Good to Very Good

 

Woodlots in the Watershed

The Southeast Environmental Association is a community-based, charitable organization established in 1992 to protect, maintain and enhance the ecology of southeastern PEI for the environmental, social and economic well-being of Island residents. SEA leads and seeks funding for several programs: Harvey Moore Wildlife Sanctuary, Stream Restoration, Water Monitoring and Biodiversity, Trails and Tours Program, Wetlands Program, Community Outreach Program, Community Food Gardens Program, Watershed Management Planning, Coastal Restoration and Planning, Experiential Tourism Program and the Community Pollinator Park.

Currently, stream restoration and watershed management are priority areas for SEA. Since 2015, we have developed Watershed Management Plans for the Montague/Valleyfield Watershed Area and the Sturgeon Watershed Area. During this time, restoration work on 26.5 kilometres of stream in the Montague, Valleyfield, Brudenell and Sturgeon Rivers has been completed. This included the removal of 30 major, 63 medium and 17 minor blockages, installation of 11 brushmats, removal of 2 crossings, removal of 8 beaver dams, planting of 420 native trees and shrubs, and the removal of 6.2km of alders. In addition, 34km of stream and riparian zone have been assessed to help plan further restoration efforts.

Stream work, which includes riparian area restoration, is highly beneficial to a woodlot. The removal of blockages reduces the occurrence of flooding, preventing the loss of trees, shrubs and viable land. Invasive species removal prevents monoculture establishment and the loss of biodiversity. Planting native trees and shrubs increases biodiversity and provides food for wildlife. The availability of cover, food and spawning grounds for fish, will increase fish populations and therefore the populations of the wildlife that rely on fish as a food source, creating active woodlots.

Woodlots are very important to the stream. A well forested riparian zone will prevent erosion of streambanks and slow runoff, preventing siltation of waterways. They provide cover for fish and other wildlife. Trees and shrubs provide food for many living things, and a supply organic material for aquatic and terrestrial insects to feed on. Trees provide shade and help regulate the temperature of the water.

Before and after shots of a blockage removal on the Montague River. Clearing the stream allows for improved flow, better fish passage and prevents silt build-up. Selective harvest could prevent blockages from occurring.

 

Healthy riparian areas are not only productive ecologically, but economically, as well. Although the trees in these areas cannot be cleared for a profit, they do provide many opportunities. Individual trees can be selectively harvested, with a Watercourse, Wetland and Buffer Zone Permit, that will produce high quality wood and economic value. Trees and shrubs can be planted and maintained that provide non-timber products that can be harvested, such as berries and nuts. Willows and poplars are great for stabilizing banks, removing excess nutrients and produce biomass for fuel. Planting these species will allow the bank to stabilize. When they reach a desired size, they can be harvested for fuel, but the root system will remain. New growth will sprout from the root system, renewing the area. The enhancement of a riparian zone also improves the aesthetic value and provides enjoyable recreational opportunities.

Working with your local watershed group to enhance your riparian zone, can provide you with labour, tools, knowledge and the appropriate permits required, as well, these groups can source desired native trees and shrubs for planting.

To learn more about SEA, the work we do and to enjoy the great outdoors, join us on February 24th, 11am-3pm, at the Harvey Moore Wildlife Sanctuary, 7096 Milltown Cross, PE, for the 2nd Annual Winter Frolic Fundraiser.

The family-fun event will include:

  • beautiful Belgian, horse-drawn sleigh rides, by MacLeod’s Sleigh Rides,
  • a chance to get up close to impressive birds of prey from Island    Falconry Services,
  • an opportunity to try out snowshoeing with equipment provided by Eastern Sports and Recreation Council, and
  • trying your hand at the archery range with Archery Tag PEI.
  • ice-sculpting demonstration by renowned local artisan, Abe Waterman.

Additional activities include:

  • guided bird tours with a local birding enthusiast,
  • learning how to identify animal tracks in the snow,
  • seeing an ‘Animals of PEI’ display hosted by Dept. of Community, Lands & Environment,
  • taking a lesson in building a wilderness survival shelter,
  • learning how to build an owl nest (can purchase for $25).
  • stream bugs’ display and indicator water testing by Holland College EAST students,
  • learning about winter photography with a local photography enthusiast, and
  • the chance to win in a 50/50 draw.

 

Hotdogs, vegetarian chili, hot chocolate and hot apple cider with be available for purchase.

Admission: Adult – $12, Under 12 – $7, and Family – $35 (4 max) each additional family member $5.

 

SEA Members: $5 discount on entrance fee

 

For more information, follow SEA on Facebook and Twitter, check out our website: www.seapei.org or contact us at 902-838-3351, or sea@pei.aibn.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-timber Forest Products

Chaga:

As we all know, forests can produce many different commercial products ranging from timber to jams, jellies and decoratives.

One product that has captured a lot of attention in recent years is Chaga. Sometimes called the “King of Medicinal Mushrooms”, Chaga has been used for centuries in Asia and parts of Europe for its unique flavor and for several reputed health benefits.

Chaga (Inonotus obliquus ) is a fungus that only grows in cold northern forests. Found on mature (usually 40 years old or older) white birch, yellow birch and gray birch it has also been reported grow on several other Acadian Forest species such as beech and poplar. Trees develop a dense black mass of mycelia (roughly 25-40cm) on their exterior.

This mass looks a bit like charcoal but it is the rusty yellow-brown material inside that is the valuable part of the fungus. Chaga is usually broken into chunks and ground down into a fine powder that can be

added to soups, stews, or smoothies providing extra nutritional value to many meals. The most popular use is for Chaga Tea which is described as having a mild vanilla flavor. It is also promoted for many different health benefits but most of these claims have not been independently verified or proven.

If harvested with care, Chaga can be harvested every 3 – 5 years until the tree dies. Efforts have been made to cultivate the fungus on other mediums but research indicates that this usually results in a reduction in the quality and ratio of several key nutrients.

With some time and effort woodlot owners can find or develop markets for Chaga products.

 

WINTER WOODLOT TOUR 2018: FORESTS FOR ISLANDERS

Watershed organizations from the West River, Hunter-Clyde and Wheatley Rivers, along with the Department of Communities, Lands and Environment, would like to invite everyone to the 7th annual Winter Woodlot Tour on Saturday, January 27, 2018. This event will run from 9:00AM to 1:00PM at the Strathgartney Equestrian Park, 18 Strathgartney Rd. in Bonshaw. The storm date will be Saturday, February 3, 2018.

Strathgartney Equestrian Park is located in the West River Watershed. This hilly area has a rich natural history encompassing fields and forests, streams and rivers, diverse wildlife habitats and multi-use recreational trails.

Fun and family-friendly activities include:                                          

.             snowshoeing

.             sleigh rides

.             rope ladders and climbing course from Scouts Canada

.             making maple syrup and more

Information stations along the wooded trails will feature:

.             winter wildlife

.             plants and trees of the Acadian Forest

.             private woodlot management

.             watershed management and stream restoration

.             forest-based products and woodworking

This annual event is intended to give everyone a taste of what public and private forests provide as a economic resource and as an important part of our Island environment. There is no charge to attend and there will be heated warming tents and as always, free hot cider.

For more information, visit Facebook: PEI Winter Woodlot Tour or contact Jordan Condon, at cqwf.pei@gmail.com or (902)394-0749.

 

INDUSTRY OUTLOOK

*Note: The price locations provided below are only a summary and it is recommended that woodlot owners should ensure they are receiving fair prices for any forest products sold from woodlot transactions.

PRICES SUMMARY – New Brunswick

Source: http://www.snbwc.ca/snbwood/markets/SPEC001.htm

PRICES SUMMARY – Nova Scotia

Source: http://hchaynesnovascotiaprices.blogspot.ca/

ASSOCIATION HAPPENINGS

Chainsaw Safety course

We are planning to schedule another chainsaw safety course. Please contact us to get your name on a participant list.

John Rowe – Chair

Cell Phone: 902-940-1933

Annual General Meeting

Planning is underway by your PEIWOA Board for the Annual General Meeting expected to be late March, 2018. It is hoped that we can have a comprehensive conference with speakers from various sectors of the forest industry in the Maritimes.

CONTACT

John Rowe – Chair

Cell Phone: 902-940-1933

rowe@pei.sympatico.ca

Website: www.peiwoa.ca/

Facebook: PEI Woodlot Owners Association

https://www.facebook.com/PEI-Woodlot-Owners-Association-245012399166879/

Thank you on behalf of the board of the Prince Edward Island Woodlot Owners Association (PEIWOA) for your support. The board continues to represent your interests to the government and Industry to add resources for you to manage your woodlots.  Your continued support will enable the PEIWOA to grow and move forward. The simplest way to provide support is to renew your membership. The regular annual fee is $25.00 or you can opt for a 2 year membership for $40.00.

PEI Federation of Agriculture members can join for 2 years for $20.00

 

Your prompt response will allow the board to plan events to meet your needs in future years. Please also encourage other woodlot owners to join so we can help even more people to add value to their woodlands.

 

Check out our Facebook page (PEI Woodlot Owners Association) and our website (http://www.peiwoa.ca/) for current and upcoming events.

 

Sincerely,

James MacDonald

Membership Secretary PEIWOA.

 

 

YOU CAN SEND YOUR CHEQUE TO:

PEI WOODLOT OWNERS ASSN.

81 PRINCE STREET,

CHARLOTTETOWN C1A 4R3

 

 

 

Name: ______________________________________   I have Woodlots in Kings County (   )

Queens County (   )

Address:_________________________________                                     Prince County (   )

 

___________________________________________       I am interested in being a director (   )                        

 

Phone: ________________________________               PAYMENT $25     1year (   ) $40   2 year   (   )

 

Email: __________________________________

 

(Office use only   date received _____________ date receipt issued ______________ Date Membership card issued ____________)

 

 

 

PEIWOA Fall Newsletter – Nov 2017

NEWSLETTER INTRODUCTION

Welcome to the third edition of the Prince Edward Island Woodlot Owners Association (PEIWOA) 2017 newsletter. The intent of these quarterly newsletters is to provide PEIWOA members with a summary of forestry and forest-related issues, opportunities, and happenings throughout PEI and the Atlantic region.

The PEIWOA is a new organization developed for Woodlot owners on Prince Edward Island. The Association is an inclusive group of woodlot owners that encourages Islanders to create a more sustainable forest ecosystem and forest resource on PEI. We thank all members for supporting this new initiative and hope that together we can continue to grow this group with a goal of enhancing the forest economy and forest industry of the Island. PEI woodlot owners have a large role to play on the Island and we are committed to being a voice for all concerns of members at a provincial and regional level.

Sincerely,

PEIWOA

 

CHAIRMAN’S MESSAGE

Hello again from the Board of Directors of the PEIWOA.  Our newsletter is behind schedule as we have lost our editor and the Board had to step up and get it done.  Everyone is very busy and when an organization runs strictly on volunteers, it is difficult to get everything accomplished on time.  We also need more input from you — the members of the PEIWOA – as to what you would like to see happen this year.  We would also like to see more of you volunteer and make an effort to get involved.

We had an opportunity to sit down with Minister Mitchell early in the summer and outline some of our ideas and suggestions for the industry on PEI.  We have lots of contact and discussion with Dep’t of Forestry personnel but we haven’t been able to move our agenda forward as quickly as we would like.

Early in September we were invited to tour the new biomass heating facility that is now in operation at the Prince County Hospital. The company –ACFOR – has a number of biomass units heating a number of government buildings here on PEI.  This should be an opportunity for PEI woodlot owners as the demand for biomass increases.  There are a number of companies already providing heat by burning biomass and this helps to decrease our dependence on oil.  Now if we can convince some of our larger industries to do likewise – it will be a “win – win” situation for everyone.  As the technology improves, the efficiency of biomass burning units is now over 90%.  This will also help in our efforts to combat climate change.

The Climate Lab at UPEI has been tasked by the PEI Gov’t to publish a paper on the Mitigation and Adaptation to Climate Change and its effects on PEI.  We have been active during the consultation phase and presented our “side of the story” when given the opportunity.  The first draft is now on their website and the final paper will be available later this month.  In our presentation, we stressed the importance of managing our woodlots and how increased plantings would help our Island forests sequester more and more carbon for years to come.

Early in September we were requested to appear before the Senate Standing Committee on Agriculture and Forestry which was holding hearings in Halifax.  We partnered with the NB Federation of Woodlot Owners and the NS Federation of Woodlot Owners and made a joint presentation on October 2nd in Halifax.  We outlined our concerns about the sustainability of the industry in the Maritimes and put forth some suggestions to highlight the true value and importance of forests – even for our very survival.  We felt that we received a fair hearing and hope that our suggestions will be acted upon is due course.

We had hoped to have a conference this fall — centered around forestry related topics – in partnership with the provincial Dep’t of Forestry.  However, with so many of their members away fighting forest fires in B.C., it was impossible to get it organized.  We are now planning something for late Feb or March in the New Year.

Our goal of doubling our membership annually can only be achieved if each and every one of you do some recruiting of family and friends who own woodlots.  It is not realistic to expect the Board of Directors alone to do all the recruiting. Our strength will be in our members and we are not growing as fast as we should.  Contact us at any time through email or phone.

My – how time flies!!  Since our last newsletter, I have participated in four meetings (conference calls) with CFWO; four meetings of the PEIFA; and four meetings of the PEIWOA.  That is on top of all the other meetings I have already reported.  And the summer was supposed to be a quiet time!!!

Hope you have a joyful and peaceful Christmas Season and all the best in the New Year.

Chairman:  John J. Rowe

 

White Spruce: The Scrappy Survivor

While often overlooked or even derided by some, there is one tree species that quietly fills a wide range of ecological, economic and social roles in Island forests.

In many ways, White spruce (P. glauca) defines much of our Island’s landscape. It protects coastal areas, particularly along the north shore, from harsh winter winds. It grows around streams and bogs providing critical shelter and food for many small mammals and birds. And probably most important, it is found in the hedgerows lining Island fields where it reduces soil erosion from wind and water, captures snow and rain fall recharging local water tables and raises field temperatures during the annual growing season.

White Spruce also has a unique ability to reclaim abandoned farm fields so it has been integral to the restoration of forests on PEI. Each year, the mature white spruce in Island hedgerows produce enormous volumes of seed and unlike almost every other Acadian Forest tree species, these seeds can sprout and grow among the tough, dense roots field grasses. Over time, these tiny seedlings out competed the grasses and reclaimed tens of thousands of hectares of abandoned farm fields on PEI. Over time, this process created more forest-like conditions allowing other Acadian Forest trees species to follow.

Given its flexibility, load bearing capacities and abundance, white spruce is also a vital component of our forest economy. Studwood and lumber sawn from white spruce is widely used across North America to build homes, businesses and other facilities and it is also an important species in the production of strong, high value paper products. This activity provides income for thousands of land owners and employment in communities across the Maritimes.

So give a shout out to this wonderful Acadian Forest species and consider the many, many values White Spruce provides to all of us each and every day.

White Spruce Silvics:

Range:                                 Atlantic Canada west to Alaska often growing above the Arctic Circle Height:                                 20+ m Diameter:                            Up to 1m but usually in the 50 – 75 cm range Shade Tolerance:              Moderate Moisture Preferences:   Moderate to high Salt Tolerance:                  High Pollution Tolerance:        Moderate

                                         

Legacy Trees

In recent years, the term Legacy Tree has gained importance during discussions on forest health, diversity and forest management.

Simply defined, a Legacy Tree is a large old tree that has survived decades or even centuries of land clearing or disturbances such as harvests, fire or wind storms. In the Acadian Forest region Legacy Trees are shade tolerant species such as sugar maple, white pine, hemlock, yellow birch, red oak and several other species. They tend to be long-lived and produce seedlings that are capable of growing in deep forest shade.

The Island’s pre-settlement forest was filled with large, long-lived tree species that could reach heights of 25 – 30m and diameters of 1 – 2m or more. However because they preferred sites with rich well-drained soils, settlers often valued the soils they grew on more that the trees themselves. Throughout the 1800s, land clearances for agriculture and intense harvest pressure for fuelwood and building materials led to serious declines in both the size and quality of Island forests.

The value of these legacy trees extends beyond their age and size. For instance, their seed often contains genetic links to the forests of earlier times and these genes are important resources for restoring healthy forests. These genes may also be useful when dealing with some of the implications of climate change.

Legacy Trees have the ability to produce large volumes of edible seeds for birds and mammals and they also support different species of lichens and mosses. Many will have large hollows or “cavities” in the trunk that can be used for denning and nesting sites. Taller trees will often offer excellent vantage points for predators, while their large branches provide vertical structure within the forest.

Today, Island forests tend to be less than 50 years old and only about 20m in height and >30cm in diameter. But many Island woodlots still contain at least a few widely-dispersed individual trees or groups of old trees that are still standing because either they were too large to handle or they were growing in inaccessible sites.

 

 

A Forest Management plan can identify any legacy trees growing on your land and help you to develop strategies to protect them and utilize the many roles they provide. The Forest Enhancement Program www.princeedwardisland.ca/FEP offers forest management advice and financial assistance to Island land owners who want to manage their lands for any number of goals and values.

Adding Nest Boxes to Your Woodlot

Being close to nature and having wildlife in your woodlot can be a very important part of the enjoyment of owning and managing a small part of the forest. There are no words to describe the feeling of seeing or being near a wild creature of the forest. Those of you who have this feeling know how important it is to maintain or even improve the possibility of having wildlife and making them feel welcomed. Managing for “Wildlife” can be a complex process of decision-making and compromises. However, there are some simple things that can make your woodlot or your back yard for that matter, a more desirable place to live.  One simple addition you can easily add to your woodlot are nest boxes. Many of the small, and not so small, birds and animals in the forest are cavity nesters. Primary excavators such as woodpeckers will create their own nest cavity. These may be used over the years by other cavity nesting species, such as chickadees and squirrels.

It may be a bit too late to get a box out this year and have it used but now it is a good time to start thinking about helping out of some of our feathers and fur friends. You should consider putting out a few in the Fall. Nest boxes can be a very helpful way to encourage some species to live in your woodlot or to your back yard.   The size and location of the nest box will help encourage, or discourage, particular species. Suitable sized nest boxes, placed in more open areas will be attractive to tree swallows and possibly chickadees. The same size boxes will be attractive to squirrels if they are close to, or in, a stand of larger trees.   Squirrels are not fond of open areas. There is one species of squirrels that are seldom seen but do live in PEI forests and that is the Flying Squirrel. These cute nocturnal animals will be very happy to use a nest box, if it isn’t already taken by a red squirrel.

You can build and erect suitable nest boxes that many species will take to with great ease. Nest boxes can be built to sizes that attract many different species of birds or mammals of all sizes. Of course the box has to be placed in suitable habitat as well. You are not going to get Barred owls nesting in a box in the city or in the open but you will if you locate a suitable size box deeper in a more mature forest. Yes, Barred owls, our second largest owl, are cavity nesters too.

There is a lot of free information on the web about nest boxes. Designs are usually quite simple. All species have their preferred size of box and opening. The opening size is quite critical to some species. Here is an excellent website to look at for more information: http://nestwatch.org/learn/all-about-birdhouses/

Nest boxes will need only a little care. They must have a way to open so that the old nesting material can be removed after the nesting season. This will reduce the parasites that will affect next year’s brood. The adults are quite capable of finding new nesting material each year so there is no need to leave the old material in there. The exception might be the owls who use course woody stems for nesting material.

Placing nest boxes in your woodlot is an ideal project that can include children and teach them to enjoy and respect the forest.

 

 

INDUSTRY OUTLOOK

*Note: The price locations provided below are only a summary and it is recommended that woodlot owners should ensure they are receiving fair prices for any forest products sold from woodlot transactions.

PRICES SUMMARY – New Brunswick

Source: http://www.snbwc.ca/snbwood/markets/SPEC001.htm

PRICES SUMMARY – Nova Scotia

Source: http://hchaynesnovascotiaprices.blogspot.ca/

ASSOCIATION HAPPENINGS

 

Chainsaw Safety course

We are planning to schedule another chainsaw safety course. Please contact us to get your name on a participant list.

John Rowe – Chair

Cell Phone: 902-940-1933

 

Annual General Meeting

Planning is underway by your PEIWOA Board for the Annual General Meeting expected to be late March, 2018. It is hoped that we can have a comprehensive conference with speakers from various sectors of the forest industry in the Maritimes.

 

CONTACT

John Rowe – Chair

Cell Phone: 902-940-1933

rowe@pei.sympatico.ca

Website: www.peiwoa.ca/

Facebook: PEI Woodlot Owners Association

https://www.facebook.com/PEI-Woodlot-Owners-Association-245012399166879/

 

 

 

Thank you on behalf of the board of the Prince Edward Island Woodlot Owners Association (PEIWOA) for your support. The board continues to represent your interests to the government and Industry to add resources for you to manage your woodlots.  Your continued support will enable the PEIWOA to grow and move forward. The simplest way to provide support is to renew your membership. The regular annual fee is $25.00 or you can opt for a 2 year membership for $40.00.

 

Your prompt response will allow the board to plan events to meet your needs in future years. Please also encourage other woodlot owners to join so we can help even more people to add value to their woodlands.

 

Check out our Facebook page (PEI Woodlot Owners Association) and our website (http://www.peiwoa.ca/) for current and upcoming events.

 

 

Sincerely,

James MacDonald

Membership Secretary PEIWOA.

 

 

YOU CAN SEND YOUR CHEQUE TO:

 

PEI WOODLOT OWNERS ASSN.

81 PRINCE STREET,

CHARLOTTETOWN C1A 4R3

 

 

 

 

Name: ______________________________________   I have Woodlots in Kings County (   )

Queens County (   )

Address:_________________________________                                     Prince County (   )

 

___________________________________________       I am interested in being a director (   )                        

 

Phone: ________________________________               PAYMENT $25     1year (   ) $40   2 year   (   )

 

Email: __________________________________

 

(Office use only   date received _____________ date receipt issued ______________ Date Membership card issued ____________)

 

 

 

PEI Woodlot Owners Association Hosts Invasive Species Workshop

November 10, 2016              Emyvale, PEI               PEI Woodlot Owners Association
The PEI Woodlot Owners Association, in partnership with Island Nature Trust and the Department of Communities Land and Environment, is holding an information session and workshop on invasive species on Saturday, November 26th, at the Emyvale Community Centre. The workshop will focus on how to identify, prevent establishment and control invasive species, particularly those associated with forests.

Invasive species are plants, animals, insects or diseases that are introduced outside of their native range and which negatively impact the environment, the economy and/or human well-being. Effects of invasive species in natural forests and managed woodlots can be devastating. According to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, forest invaders are responsible for $720 million, annually, in losses to the timber industry in Canada.

Organizers say it’s important to raise awareness of invasive species and to take a preventative approach. “Invasive species represent a major threat to our forests and woodlots on PEI. As our climate changes, we will be more vulnerable to introductions of invasive species from the northeastern US and Asia. To combat this, we must educate ourselves on how to identify invasive species and pathways for their spread, and be on the lookout for new invaders before they become established”, says John Rowe, Chair of the PEI Woodlot Owners Association.

The information session and workshop begins at 9:00am on November 26th, at the Emyvale Community Center in Emyvale, PEI. All woodlot owners, members of conservation and watershed groups, and other interested individuals are welcome and encouraged to attend. There is no admission cost for the event.

Notes to editors:

* Presenters at the workshop will include: Megan Harris (Executive Director, Island Nature Trust) and David Carmichael (Horticulturalist/Pest Detection Officer, P.E.I. Department of Communities Lands and Environment)

* Islanders wanting to learn more about invasive species on PEI should visit the PEI Invasive Species Council’s website (www.peiinvasives.ca)