Newsletter Feb 2019

NEWSLETTER INTRODUCTION

Welcome to first edition of the Prince Edward Island Woodlot Owners Association

(PEIWOA) 2019 Newsletter. The intent of these quarterly newsletters is to provide PEIWOA members with a summary of forestry and forest-related issues, opportunities, and happenings throughout PEI and the Atlantic region.

The PEIWOA is an Association of woodlot owners that encourages Islanders to create a more sustainable forest ecosystem and forest resource on PEI. We thank all members for supporting our initiative and hope that together we can continue to grow this group with a goal of enhancing the forest economy and forest industry of the Island. PEI woodlot owners have a large role to play on the Island and we are committed to being a voice for all concerns of members at a provincial and regional level.

PEIWOA

 

CHAIRMAN’S MESSAGE

January Report — 2019 – PEI Woodlot Owners Association

“Happy New Year” to all from the Board of Directors of the PEIWOA. Welcome to the first newsletter of 2019. We aim to publish three or four during the fiscal year and welcome articles from anyone who would like to write on a timely topic for the woodlot community.

We are in the planning stages of setting up an advisory group to work with our new Minister of Communities, Land and Environment — the Hon. Richard Brown. We hope it will include individuals from watershed groups; woodlot owners; and members from government departments like forestry and environment. There are a number of issues that we feel are important to the woodlot owners of PEI and we want to work with everyone to improve our industry and the environment.

In the month of November we were able to partner with The Climate Lab at UPEI and present a lecture by learned professor Dr. Gert-Jan Nabuurs from the Netherlands. He spoke about the European experience with developing sustainable forestry in various countries and their efforts to decrease their dependence on imported oil. He spoke about his experience with many research projects throughout Europe and North America relating to climate change, biomass production, biodiversity, and bioenergy. He made many suggestions how we here on PEI could benefit from their experience and move towards a more sustainable industry for the future.

During the month of December, we had an opportunity to meet with our Members of Parliament          — representing PEI in Ottawa – and briefed them on proposals that are now before parliament that were presented by the Canadian Federation of Woodlot Owners (CFWO) – of which we are a member. We plan to have a presence during the 2019 Winter Woodlot Tour which will be held the second Saturday in February – weather permitting. Please find the details elsewhere in this newsletter and plan to join us — if possible.

Please renew your membership at your earliest convenience — either online or by mail – and continue to promote our association to your friends and neighbors and fellow woodlot owners. We are always looking for members who would like to volunteer to serve on the Board. Don’t hesitate to get involved; the future of woodland on PEI is in your hands.   John J. Rowe; Chairman — PEIWOA

Chairman:  John J. Rowe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BOOK REVIEWS

I recently enjoyed reading this little book and believe many woodlot owners will too. Below are some excerpts from two summaries on the web to give you its flavour. It is available by request from our wonderful local PEI public libraries. Kathy Stuart, Board Member PEIWOA

________________________________________________________________________________

 

The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate—Discoveries from a Secret World

 

Peter Wohlleben, 2015 (2016, U.S. printing)

Greystone Books 288 pp.

ISBN-13: 9781771642484

Summary from: http://www.litlovers.com/reading-guides/fiction/10926-hiddenlife-of-trees-wohlleben?showall=1

 

Are trees social beings?

In this international bestseller, forester and author Peter Wohlleben convincingly makes the case that, yes, the forest is a social network.

He draws on groundbreaking scientific discoveries to describe how trees are like human families: tree parents live together with their children, communicate with them, support them as they grow, share nutrients with those who are sick or struggling, and even warn each other of impending dangers.

Wohlleben also shares his deep love of woods and forests, explaining the amazing processes of life, death, and regeneration he has observed in his woodland.

 

After learning about the complex life of trees, a walk in the woods will never be the same again.”

Summary from: http://www.supersummary.com/the-hidden-life-of-trees/summary/

“Subtitled What They Feel, How They Communicate, his book analyzes the ways in which trees are deeply interlinked and exhibit behaviors that can be thought of in anthropomorphic terms. The science of tree connectivity shows that they are able to distinguish their own species from others – and respond differently depending on neighbor tree identity. After explaining tree communication,

Wohlleben delves into the complex eco-systems of forests.

The rest of Wohllebenʼs book explains how he uses his newfound knowledge to manage the forest in the Eifel Mount1ins of western Germany where he lives.

 

Heavy machinery is no longer allowed, and neither are the rigid rows of planted trees promoted by his original training. Instead, he has put in place programs such as “renting” large old trees as tombstone memorials where mourners can deposit the ashes of their loved ones – 1 way of generating income from the forest without actu1lly cutting down any trees. Keeping trees in place also prevents soil

erosion and instead generates increasingly rich and fertile topsoil year after year.

What is most impressive is that no matter how radical Wohllebenʼs claims about tree intelligence and ability to feel pain and communicate with other trees is, his writing almost never errs on the side of sentimentality. Instead, his book aptly compares trees – the oldest living organisms on earth – to elephants, another long-lived and surprisingly sentient creature. He argues that it is only sensible to

limit wood consumption, change how we treat the forests we have, and rethink our concept of trees as inanimate objects.”

 

Letter to PEI Members of Parliament                                                                                                          November 2018

 

Three Federal issues of concern to woodlot owners in Prince Edward Island on which we would welcome your support

 

An exemption for lumber from private forest sawlogs in the Softwood Lumber Agreement

As sellers of sawlogs, woodlot owners hope for a positive resolution of the SLA dispute. We are experiencing price reductions and fear that the real risk of sawmill closures could be even more damaging. Lumber from private forest timber is not an issue for the Americans: their domestic timber market is dominated by private forest sawlogs, and the unrestricted flow of sawlogs across the border, which is the case in all provinces but British Columbia, has been viewed by them in the past as a positive attribute. Verification of the origin of an individual sawmill’s sawlog supply is no more complicated than the chain of custody systems used in forest certification. An exemption would relieve the “collateral damage” being experienced by many thousands of woodlot owners and benefit the sawmills to whom we sell.

 

Through the Canadian Federation of Woodlot Owners (CFWO), we have had good communication with the SLA negotiating team at Global Affairs Canada. At a meeting with them on Sept. 19, 2018 we were assured that our request for an exemption would be on the table when negotiations resume.

 

A Personal Silviculture Savings and Investment Plan

Proper forest management of woodlots involves a disconnect between years when planting and thinning should be done, and years when harvesting is appropriate. This disconnect is accentuated after natural disasters or insect and disease outbreaks. In order to recover at least some value from the silviculture investments of previous decades, a woodlot owner or license holder must desperately try to salvage as much damaged timber as possible before decay makes it unsaleable. The resulting spike in revenue has significant income tax implications. The disconnect between revenue from sale of timber and silviculture expenses is unlike the circumstances faced by other small businesses. Provisions exists in Income Tax policy for carrying back or forward a portion of the costs of planting and thinning, but these are limited. This limited ability to deduct expenses from revenue is a major disincentive to increased silviculture and reforestation.

 

We have proposed the “Personal Silviculture Savings and Investment Plan” (PSSIP) as a solution. Revenue from harvests could be deposited in a registered account similar in structure to an RRSP. Principle and interest would be withdrawn when planting and thinning are required on the woodlot. Appropriate administrative guidelines for PSSIP’s have been discussed for several years with officials from the Dept of Finance and the CRA, most recently on November 2. We believe there are no practical or technical impediments to our proposal. If PSSIP’s become a tool available to woodlot owners and license holders, they will provide a big incentive for more tree planting and silviculture. The result will be broad benefits for rural development and climate change mitigation; increased timber supplies will strengthen the competitiveness of Canada’s forest industry.

 

A national silviculture and tree planting program

In the Pan Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change in December 2015, we were pleased to see recognition of the importance of our efforts to manage our forests.

We work in our forests on a regular basis, so we see the damage being done to forests by extreme weather and increasing insect and disease outbreaks. We also see how our silviculture and tree planting work increases the growth and health of forests. The Framework recognizes the high potential contribution of increased silviculture and tree planting in the fight against climate change.

We are committed to increasing our existing silviculture and tree planting efforts. This will include avoiding deforestation, reforesting previously denuded land, and regenerating forests subjected to catastrophic events. For us to do so, the economics must make sense. Silviculture and tree planting cost money. The return on these investments comes in the form of revenue when the trees are harvested. That is normally a matter of 20-35 years in the case of pre-commercial thinning and 50 to 60 years when trees are planted. In recognition of the very long-term nature of silviculture and tree-planting investments, and of the broad public benefits from these investments, governments have often shared the cost with woodlot owners. This was the case with the FRDA’s (Federal-provincial Resource Development Agreements) of the 1980’s and ’90’s, and in all provincially funded programs currently in existence (Québec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island). Owner contribution has always been set at 10% of the total cost (cash or in kind) because it makes no financial sense for owners to invest more than that. It does make sense for governments to contribute 90% of the costs because of the large benefits to society as a whole:

  • rural employment (silviculture and logging contractors),
  • industrial timber supply (mill employment, spinoff employment)
  • environmental benefits (water, biodiversity, carbon: except in some exceptional cases, markets don’t pay for these goods and services)

In addition to the 10% contribution to direct costs, owners are also indirectly contributing the general costs associated with property ownership (taxes, insurance, boundary line maintenance, regular inspections) In a proportion of cases, there is a measurable opportunity cost associated with silviculture, and especially planting of marginal farmland, e.g. revenue foregone from rent for hay production or grazing.

 

In response to the Pan-Canadian Framework, seven provincial woodlot owner associations proposed silviculture and tree planting programs grouped under the title: “Mobilizing Canadian Private Forest Owners to Fight Climate Change” which we submitted to the ECCC portal in July 2016. In many cases these proposals will augment existing provincial programs already in place, and in all cases, associations are in active discussions with their respective provincial government authorities to ensure provincial government involvement. The proposals involve a mix of silviculture and tree planting tailored to the specific conditions in each province.

 

These proposals will contribute to Canada’s efforts to fight climate change in five ways:

  • As forest growth is increased through silviculture and tree planting, carbon will be taken up from the atmosphere for long-term storage.
  • As this increased forest growth contributes to an increase in sustainable production of timber in the medium and long term, the lumber used in building construction, furniture and other long-term wood usage will add to the long-term storage of carbon.
  • Increased use of wood for construction and household goods will reduce the Green House Gas emissions from the production of concrete and steel that would otherwise have been used in those buildings and goods.
  • The program as proposed in July 2016 will allow several tens of thousands of Canadians to make a concrete and meaningful contribution to fighting climate change, and in a way, which carries a positive benefit for rural economic development; the trade-offs between the environment and the economy that are frequently encountered in actions related to fighting climate change are avoided.
  • Public awareness of the critical role of forests in fighting climate change will be increased with field days organized by the associations near urban centers.We were again very pleased when the Low Carbon Economy Fund was announced in June 2017 to see that forestry (with agriculture) was identified as one of three priority areas for support by the Fund. We submitted an Expression of Interest in May 2018 for the Challenge portion of the Fund and received an invitation to submit a detailed proposal for a three-year proposal in August. Unfortunately, conditions attached to the invitation have made it impossible for us to proceed: because woodlots are considered to be profit making businesses, we would be eligible for 25% Federal support (not 40% for non-profit organizations), and we would be required to identify all 7000 participants in the application. Each of these conditions is insurmountable.We see two possible routes that would make a national tree planting program a reality in 2019:
  • Additional money be made available to the provincial government “Leadership” portion of the

 

    1.        Fund where the two conditions would not apply.
  • Establish a budget for a national program separate from the Fund and under Natural 

 

  1. We have proposed two ways in which the Federal government can support our efforts to grow more trees and healthier forests. If the Personal Silviculture Savings and Investment Plan, and a national silviculture and tree planting program seems like good ideas to you, please help us make them happen.
  2.        Resources Canada

 

PEI Woodlot Owners Association (PEIWOA) Chainsaw Training Program

Objective: The project is intended to bring Chainsaw training to interested individuals on PEI. The goal is to promote a safe working environment and sustainable forest management in the forested woodlots of PEI. The PEIWOA want to establish a training program where they can offer training to their members and individuals who want to work in their woodlots but do not have the training. This project will support the forest industry and work toward training individuals with skills needed to be employable to contractors and supporting the forest management needs of the woodlot owners of PEI.

The desire to have chainsaw training available for all Islanders is an important objective of the PEIWOA. The use of chainsaws in PEI has remained consistent and the continual support to Forest contractors, Watershed Groups and the Agriculture community has lessened over the years.

The location of the training courses will be centered in where individuals have expressed interest in the course.

Project Activities: Each participant will be given the web site address to access the Manual: The Forest Professional which is the document endorsed by the Atlantic Provinces Occupational Health and Safety Agencies. This manual is intended to represent acceptable Industry practices and is used as a resource for the training.

The project will offer in class instruction to promote the safety and well-being of all persons when using a chainsaw by offering training in chainsaw safety, maintenance use and cutting techniques. Participants will be required to work on a chainsaw and understand how it works and to develop the skill needed to demonstrate how to operate the chainsaw. A certificate will be presented when this is accomplished by each participant.

Each participant will be evaluated on:

Work site assessment: includes assessment of work area, requirements for workplace safety, and pre-cut site evaluation.

Operation of Chainsaw: includes safety equipment for operator (PPE), Safety features on chainsaw, maintenance of chainsaw and procedures for starting the chainsaw.

Cutting procedures: includes procedure for felling trees, for directional felling, for delimbing trees, for bucking trees and for leaning or lodged trees.

The expectation of the training program is for all participants to partake in classroom activities and to physically demonstrate the skills required. Each participant will leave the course with the ability to operate a chainsaw as an employee or woodlot owner. Each participant will learn to respect, to control the power, make sound decisions and use good judgement while using a chainsaw.

Success can be measured by the skill level and the knowledge that is gained through course evaluations. The increase in safety awareness will control the risks and reduce the cause of accidents and near misses. The knowledge of how you create a safe work environment will promote an increase in forest management activities.

The Potential Environmental impacts will be the improvement to the overall health of woodlots on PEI. There will be changes to woodlots because of work implemented as a result of more trained workers. Stands that will have forest management done can expect to experience a change in plant diversity and animal activity.

 

Edible Tree Canada program      Interested in edible nut and fruit trees? There is a tree Canada edible tree program that is designed to help the public learn more about agro-forestry and have access to such sites.      Applicants must provide a full description of their tree planting project and its benefits to the local community. The proposed project should take place on a public site that is accessible to the community. Trees should be able to grow in perpetuity, allowing for the longevity of the positive impacts of the project. Tangible and measurable goals should be emphasized throughout the proposal reflecting the needs of the community and how they will benefit from the trees. An educational component to engage community members with the project is also recommended.

When considering planting activities, please keep in mind that planting seasons are spring 2019 (May 1st – June 30th) and Fall 2019 (September 1st – October 31st). The number of trees intended for the project should be based on the available space of the site and the grant amount ($3,500).

Community Engagement:

Long-term engagement with the project is a primary objective of the program. Please include an explanation of how the proposed project will engage with the local community and provide a plan for how members will maintain their involvement in the project over time.

Technical Expertise and maintenance:

The project must be supported by someone with technical expertise to guide the applicant through its efforts. It is important to develop a maintenance plan for the harvest and to ensure the survival of the trees. Also, evaluation criteria should be elaborated in order to monitor the success of the project over the years.

Promotion and Event:

A planting activity and recognition event is required for the project. Please include a proposed date and description of an event where you will acknowledge the efforts of your community as well as the sponsors that have made your project possible. Funding of the grant is contingent on the applicant hosting a recognition event.

To help you determine your species selection and cost per tree, contact Jesse Argent at Havenloft Tree Nursery. (902) 218-3034, havnelofttreenursery@gmail.com.

Jesse can help you come up with an agroforestry plan, and go over the application with you. As well as bring technical expertise on the application and installment

 

The Winter Woodlot Tour 2019

The Official tour began in 2010, evolving from events for woodlot owners organized by the PEI Model Forest (Healthy Forests, Healthy Communities) Program. It was Wheatley River, Hunter-Clyde, and the PEI Model Forest that began the Winter Woodlot Tour; the Central Queens Wildlife Federation joined the organizing team in 2014. The site of the tour changes every year, alternating between the three watershed groups involved. The site for the Winter Woodlot Tour typically falls on privately owned agricultural and forest land, showcasing the diversity of Island resources from farming to forestry and recreational activities. Attendance has grown over the years, from roughly 400 in 2010 to over 1,200 in 2017. This annual event is intended to give Islanders a taste of what our forests can do for us, both as a sustainable resource and an important part of our Island environment.

Come Join Us For An Action Packed Day Outside!

Strathgartney Equestrian Park

18 Strathgartney Rd, Bonshaw, PEI

Feb 9th, 2019   9:00 am – 1:00 pm

Strathgartney Equestrian Park is located in the West River Watershed. This hilly area has a rich natural history encompassing fields and forests, streams and rivers, diverse wildlife habitats and multi-use recreational trails.

Fun and family-friendly activities include:                                          

.             snowshoeing

.           sleigh rides

.           rope ladders and climbing course from Scouts Canada

.           making maple syrup and more

Information stations along the wooded trails will feature:

.             winter wildlife

.             plants and trees of the Acadian Forest

.             private woodlot management

.             watershed management and stream restoration

.             forest-based products and woodworking

This annual event is intended to give everyone a taste of what public and private forests provide as a economic resource and as an important part of our Island environment. There is no charge to attend and there will be heated warming tents and as always, free hot cider.

For more information, visit Facebook: PEI Winter Woodlot Tour or                    

                                                                           https://infopeiwinterwoodl.wixsite.com/winterwoodlottour

INDUSTRY OUTLOOK

*Note: The price locations provided below are only a summary and it is recommended that woodlot owners should ensure they are receiving fair prices for any forest products sold from woodlot transactions.

PRICES SUMMARY – New Brunswick

Source: http://www.snbwc.ca/snbwood/markets/SPEC001.htm

PRICES SUMMARY – Nova Scotia

Source: http://hchaynesnovascotiaprices.blogspot.ca/

ASSOCIATION HAPPENINGS

Annual General Meeting

Planning is underway by your PEIWOA Board for the Annual General Meeting 27 April 2019 at Milton Community Hall – 7 New Glasgow Road (intersection of Rte. 7 and Rte. 224)

We planning to have a comprehensive conference with speakers from various sectors of the forest industry in the Maritimes.

CONTACT

John Rowe – Chair                 Cell Phone: 902-940-1933

rowe@pei.sympatico.ca or peiwoodlotowners@gmail.com             Website: www.peiwoa.ca/

Facebook: PEI Woodlot Owners Association

https://www.facebook.com/PEI-Woodlot-Owners-Association-245012399166879/

Thank you on behalf of the board of the Prince Edward Island Woodlot Owners Association (PEIWOA) for your support. The board continues to represent your interests to the government and Industry to add resources for you to manage your woodlots.  Your continued support will enable the PEIWOA to grow and move forward. The simplest way to provide support is to renew your membership. The regular annual fee is $25.00 or you can opt for a 2 year membership for $40.00.

PEI Federation of Agriculture members can join for 2 years for $20.00.

 

Your prompt response will allow the board to plan events to meet your needs in future years. Please also encourage other woodlot owners to join so we can help even more people to add value to their woodlands.

 

Check out our Facebook page (PEI Woodlot Owners Association) and our website (http://www.peiwoa.ca/) for current and upcoming events.

 

Sincerely,

James MacDonald

Membership Secretary PEIWOA

 

YOU CAN MAKE PAYMENT VIA Interac©payment or SEND YOUR CHEQUE TO:

  

   PEI WOODLOT OWNERS ASSN.

81 PRINCE STREET,

CHARLOTTETOWN C1A 4R3

 

 

Name: ______________________________________     I have Woodlots in Kings County  (   )

Queens County (   )

Address:_________________________________                                     Prince County  (   )

 

___________________________________________       I am interested in being a director (   )                        

 

Phone: ________________________________                 PAYMENT $25   1year (     ) $40   2 year (   )

 

Email: __________________________________

 

(Office use only   date received _____________ date receipt issued ______________ Date Membership card issued ____________)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEWSLETTER INTRODUCTION

Welcome to first edition of the Prince Edward Island Woodlot Owners Association

(PEIWOA) 2019 Newsletter. The intent of these quarterly newsletters is to provide PEIWOA members with a summary of forestry and forest-related issues, opportunities, and happenings throughout PEI and the Atlantic region.

The PEIWOA is an Association of woodlot owners that encourages Islanders to create a more sustainable forest ecosystem and forest resource on PEI. We thank all members for supporting our initiative and hope that together we can continue to grow this group with a goal of enhancing the forest economy and forest industry of the Island. PEI woodlot owners have a large role to play on the Island and we are committed to being a voice for all concerns of members at a provincial and regional level.

PEIWOA

 

CHAIRMAN’S MESSAGE

January Report — 2019 – PEI Woodlot Owners Association

“Happy New Year” to all from the Board of Directors of the PEIWOA. Welcome to the first newsletter of 2019. We aim to publish three or four during the fiscal year and welcome articles from anyone who would like to write on a timely topic for the woodlot community.

We are in the planning stages of setting up an advisory group to work with our new Minister of Communities, Land and Environment — the Hon. Richard Brown. We hope it will include individuals from watershed groups; woodlot owners; and members from government departments like forestry and environment. There are a number of issues that we feel are important to the woodlot owners of PEI and we want to work with everyone to improve our industry and the environment.

In the month of November we were able to partner with The Climate Lab at UPEI and present a lecture by learned professor Dr. Gert-Jan Nabuurs from the Netherlands. He spoke about the European experience with developing sustainable forestry in various countries and their efforts to decrease their dependence on imported oil. He spoke about his experience with many research projects throughout Europe and North America relating to climate change, biomass production, biodiversity, and bioenergy. He made many suggestions how we here on PEI could benefit from their experience and move towards a more sustainable industry for the future.

During the month of December, we had an opportunity to meet with our Members of Parliament          — representing PEI in Ottawa – and briefed them on proposals that are now before parliament that were presented by the Canadian Federation of Woodlot Owners (CFWO) – of which we are a member. We plan to have a presence during the 2019 Winter Woodlot Tour which will be held the second Saturday in February – weather permitting. Please find the details elsewhere in this newsletter and plan to join us — if possible.

Please renew your membership at your earliest convenience — either online or by mail – and continue to promote our association to your friends and neighbors and fellow woodlot owners. We are always looking for members who would like to volunteer to serve on the Board. Don’t hesitate to get involved; the future of woodland on PEI is in your hands.   John J. Rowe; Chairman — PEIWOA

Chairman:  John J. Rowe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BOOK REVIEWS

I recently enjoyed reading this little book and believe many woodlot owners will too. Below are some excerpts from two summaries on the web to give you its flavour. It is available by request from our wonderful local PEI public libraries. Kathy Stuart, Board Member PEIWOA

________________________________________________________________________________

 

The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate—Discoveries from a Secret World

 

Peter Wohlleben, 2015 (2016, U.S. printing)

Greystone Books 288 pp.

ISBN-13: 9781771642484

Summary from: http://www.litlovers.com/reading-guides/fiction/10926-hiddenlife-of-trees-wohlleben?showall=1

 

Are trees social beings?

In this international bestseller, forester and author Peter Wohlleben convincingly makes the case that, yes, the forest is a social network.

He draws on groundbreaking scientific discoveries to describe how trees are like human families: tree parents live together with their children, communicate with them, support them as they grow, share nutrients with those who are sick or struggling, and even warn each other of impending dangers.

Wohlleben also shares his deep love of woods and forests, explaining the amazing processes of life, death, and regeneration he has observed in his woodland.

 

After learning about the complex life of trees, a walk in the woods will never be the same again.”

Summary from: http://www.supersummary.com/the-hidden-life-of-trees/summary/

“Subtitled What They Feel, How They Communicate, his book analyzes the ways in which trees are deeply interlinked and exhibit behaviors that can be thought of in anthropomorphic terms. The science of tree connectivity shows that they are able to distinguish their own species from others – and respond differently depending on neighbor tree identity. After explaining tree communication,

Wohlleben delves into the complex eco-systems of forests.

The rest of Wohllebenʼs book explains how he uses his newfound knowledge to manage the forest in the Eifel Mount1ins of western Germany where he lives.

 

Heavy machinery is no longer allowed, and neither are the rigid rows of planted trees promoted by his original training. Instead, he has put in place programs such as “renting” large old trees as tombstone memorials where mourners can deposit the ashes of their loved ones – 1 way of generating income from the forest without actu1lly cutting down any trees. Keeping trees in place also prevents soil

erosion and instead generates increasingly rich and fertile topsoil year after year.

What is most impressive is that no matter how radical Wohllebenʼs claims about tree intelligence and ability to feel pain and communicate with other trees is, his writing almost never errs on the side of sentimentality. Instead, his book aptly compares trees – the oldest living organisms on earth – to elephants, another long-lived and surprisingly sentient creature. He argues that it is only sensible to

limit wood consumption, change how we treat the forests we have, and rethink our concept of trees as inanimate objects.”

 

Letter to PEI Members of Parliament                                                                                                          November 2018

 

Three Federal issues of concern to woodlot owners in Prince Edward Island on which we would welcome your support

 

An exemption for lumber from private forest sawlogs in the Softwood Lumber Agreement

As sellers of sawlogs, woodlot owners hope for a positive resolution of the SLA dispute. We are experiencing price reductions and fear that the real risk of sawmill closures could be even more damaging. Lumber from private forest timber is not an issue for the Americans: their domestic timber market is dominated by private forest sawlogs, and the unrestricted flow of sawlogs across the border, which is the case in all provinces but British Columbia, has been viewed by them in the past as a positive attribute. Verification of the origin of an individual sawmill’s sawlog supply is no more complicated than the chain of custody systems used in forest certification. An exemption would relieve the “collateral damage” being experienced by many thousands of woodlot owners and benefit the sawmills to whom we sell.

 

Through the Canadian Federation of Woodlot Owners (CFWO), we have had good communication with the SLA negotiating team at Global Affairs Canada. At a meeting with them on Sept. 19, 2018 we were assured that our request for an exemption would be on the table when negotiations resume.

 

A Personal Silviculture Savings and Investment Plan

Proper forest management of woodlots involves a disconnect between years when planting and thinning should be done, and years when harvesting is appropriate. This disconnect is accentuated after natural disasters or insect and disease outbreaks. In order to recover at least some value from the silviculture investments of previous decades, a woodlot owner or license holder must desperately try to salvage as much damaged timber as possible before decay makes it unsaleable. The resulting spike in revenue has significant income tax implications. The disconnect between revenue from sale of timber and silviculture expenses is unlike the circumstances faced by other small businesses. Provisions exists in Income Tax policy for carrying back or forward a portion of the costs of planting and thinning, but these are limited. This limited ability to deduct expenses from revenue is a major disincentive to increased silviculture and reforestation.

 

We have proposed the “Personal Silviculture Savings and Investment Plan” (PSSIP) as a solution. Revenue from harvests could be deposited in a registered account similar in structure to an RRSP. Principle and interest would be withdrawn when planting and thinning are required on the woodlot. Appropriate administrative guidelines for PSSIP’s have been discussed for several years with officials from the Dept of Finance and the CRA, most recently on November 2. We believe there are no practical or technical impediments to our proposal. If PSSIP’s become a tool available to woodlot owners and license holders, they will provide a big incentive for more tree planting and silviculture. The result will be broad benefits for rural development and climate change mitigation; increased timber supplies will strengthen the competitiveness of Canada’s forest industry.

 

A national silviculture and tree planting program

In the Pan Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change in December 2015, we were pleased to see recognition of the importance of our efforts to manage our forests.

We work in our forests on a regular basis, so we see the damage being done to forests by extreme weather and increasing insect and disease outbreaks. We also see how our silviculture and tree planting work increases the growth and health of forests. The Framework recognizes the high potential contribution of increased silviculture and tree planting in the fight against climate change.

We are committed to increasing our existing silviculture and tree planting efforts. This will include avoiding deforestation, reforesting previously denuded land, and regenerating forests subjected to catastrophic events. For us to do so, the economics must make sense. Silviculture and tree planting cost money. The return on these investments comes in the form of revenue when the trees are harvested. That is normally a matter of 20-35 years in the case of pre-commercial thinning and 50 to 60 years when trees are planted. In recognition of the very long-term nature of silviculture and tree-planting investments, and of the broad public benefits from these investments, governments have often shared the cost with woodlot owners. This was the case with the FRDA’s (Federal-provincial Resource Development Agreements) of the 1980’s and ’90’s, and in all provincially funded programs currently in existence (Québec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island). Owner contribution has always been set at 10% of the total cost (cash or in kind) because it makes no financial sense for owners to invest more than that. It does make sense for governments to contribute 90% of the costs because of the large benefits to society as a whole:

  • rural employment (silviculture and logging contractors),
  • industrial timber supply (mill employment, spinoff employment)
  • environmental benefits (water, biodiversity, carbon: except in some exceptional cases, markets don’t pay for these goods and services)

In addition to the 10% contribution to direct costs, owners are also indirectly contributing the general costs associated with property ownership (taxes, insurance, boundary line maintenance, regular inspections) In a proportion of cases, there is a measurable opportunity cost associated with silviculture, and especially planting of marginal farmland, e.g. revenue foregone from rent for hay production or grazing.

 

In response to the Pan-Canadian Framework, seven provincial woodlot owner associations proposed silviculture and tree planting programs grouped under the title: “Mobilizing Canadian Private Forest Owners to Fight Climate Change” which we submitted to the ECCC portal in July 2016. In many cases these proposals will augment existing provincial programs already in place, and in all cases, associations are in active discussions with their respective provincial government authorities to ensure provincial government involvement. The proposals involve a mix of silviculture and tree planting tailored to the specific conditions in each province.

 

These proposals will contribute to Canada’s efforts to fight climate change in five ways:

  • As forest growth is increased through silviculture and tree planting, carbon will be taken up from the atmosphere for long-term storage.
  • As this increased forest growth contributes to an increase in sustainable production of timber in the medium and long term, the lumber used in building construction, furniture and other long-term wood usage will add to the long-term storage of carbon.
  • Increased use of wood for construction and household goods will reduce the Green House Gas emissions from the production of concrete and steel that would otherwise have been used in those buildings and goods.
  • The program as proposed in July 2016 will allow several tens of thousands of Canadians to make a concrete and meaningful contribution to fighting climate change, and in a way, which carries a positive benefit for rural economic development; the trade-offs between the environment and the economy that are frequently encountered in actions related to fighting climate change are avoided.
  • Public awareness of the critical role of forests in fighting climate change will be increased with field days organized by the associations near urban centers.We were again very pleased when the Low Carbon Economy Fund was announced in June 2017 to see that forestry (with agriculture) was identified as one of three priority areas for support by the Fund. We submitted an Expression of Interest in May 2018 for the Challenge portion of the Fund and received an invitation to submit a detailed proposal for a three-year proposal in August. Unfortunately, conditions attached to the invitation have made it impossible for us to proceed: because woodlots are considered to be profit making businesses, we would be eligible for 25% Federal support (not 40% for non-profit organizations), and we would be required to identify all 7000 participants in the application. Each of these conditions is insurmountable.We see two possible routes that would make a national tree planting program a reality in 2019:
  • Additional money be made available to the provincial government “Leadership” portion of the

 

    1.        Fund where the two conditions would not apply.
  • Establish a budget for a national program separate from the Fund and under Natural 

 

  1. We have proposed two ways in which the Federal government can support our efforts to grow more trees and healthier forests. If the Personal Silviculture Savings and Investment Plan, and a national silviculture and tree planting program seems like good ideas to you, please help us make them happen.
  2.        Resources Canada

 

PEI Woodlot Owners Association (PEIWOA) Chainsaw Training Program

Objective: The project is intended to bring Chainsaw training to interested individuals on PEI. The goal is to promote a safe working environment and sustainable forest management in the forested woodlots of PEI. The PEIWOA want to establish a training program where they can offer training to their members and individuals who want to work in their woodlots but do not have the training. This project will support the forest industry and work toward training individuals with skills needed to be employable to contractors and supporting the forest management needs of the woodlot owners of PEI.

The desire to have chainsaw training available for all Islanders is an important objective of the PEIWOA. The use of chainsaws in PEI has remained consistent and the continual support to Forest contractors, Watershed Groups and the Agriculture community has lessened over the years.

The location of the training courses will be centered in where individuals have expressed interest in the course.

Project Activities: Each participant will be given the web site address to access the Manual: The Forest Professional which is the document endorsed by the Atlantic Provinces Occupational Health and Safety Agencies. This manual is intended to represent acceptable Industry practices and is used as a resource for the training.

The project will offer in class instruction to promote the safety and well-being of all persons when using a chainsaw by offering training in chainsaw safety, maintenance use and cutting techniques. Participants will be required to work on a chainsaw and understand how it works and to develop the skill needed to demonstrate how to operate the chainsaw. A certificate will be presented when this is accomplished by each participant.

Each participant will be evaluated on:

Work site assessment: includes assessment of work area, requirements for workplace safety, and pre-cut site evaluation.

Operation of Chainsaw: includes safety equipment for operator (PPE), Safety features on chainsaw, maintenance of chainsaw and procedures for starting the chainsaw.

Cutting procedures: includes procedure for felling trees, for directional felling, for delimbing trees, for bucking trees and for leaning or lodged trees.

The expectation of the training program is for all participants to partake in classroom activities and to physically demonstrate the skills required. Each participant will leave the course with the ability to operate a chainsaw as an employee or woodlot owner. Each participant will learn to respect, to control the power, make sound decisions and use good judgement while using a chainsaw.

Success can be measured by the skill level and the knowledge that is gained through course evaluations. The increase in safety awareness will control the risks and reduce the cause of accidents and near misses. The knowledge of how you create a safe work environment will promote an increase in forest management activities.

The Potential Environmental impacts will be the improvement to the overall health of woodlots on PEI. There will be changes to woodlots because of work implemented as a result of more trained workers. Stands that will have forest management done can expect to experience a change in plant diversity and animal activity.

 

Edible Tree Canada program      Interested in edible nut and fruit trees? There is a tree Canada edible tree program that is designed to help the public learn more about agro-forestry and have access to such sites.      Applicants must provide a full description of their tree planting project and its benefits to the local community. The proposed project should take place on a public site that is accessible to the community. Trees should be able to grow in perpetuity, allowing for the longevity of the positive impacts of the project. Tangible and measurable goals should be emphasized throughout the proposal reflecting the needs of the community and how they will benefit from the trees. An educational component to engage community members with the project is also recommended.

When considering planting activities, please keep in mind that planting seasons are spring 2019 (May 1st – June 30th) and Fall 2019 (September 1st – October 31st). The number of trees intended for the project should be based on the available space of the site and the grant amount ($3,500).

Community Engagement:

Long-term engagement with the project is a primary objective of the program. Please include an explanation of how the proposed project will engage with the local community and provide a plan for how members will maintain their involvement in the project over time.

Technical Expertise and maintenance:

The project must be supported by someone with technical expertise to guide the applicant through its efforts. It is important to develop a maintenance plan for the harvest and to ensure the survival of the trees. Also, evaluation criteria should be elaborated in order to monitor the success of the project over the years.

Promotion and Event:

A planting activity and recognition event is required for the project. Please include a proposed date and description of an event where you will acknowledge the efforts of your community as well as the sponsors that have made your project possible. Funding of the grant is contingent on the applicant hosting a recognition event.

To help you determine your species selection and cost per tree, contact Jesse Argent at Havenloft Tree Nursery. (902) 218-3034, havnelofttreenursery@gmail.com.

Jesse can help you come up with an agroforestry plan, and go over the application with you. As well as bring technical expertise on the application and installment

 

The Winter Woodlot Tour 2019

The Official tour began in 2010, evolving from events for woodlot owners organized by the PEI Model Forest (Healthy Forests, Healthy Communities) Program. It was Wheatley River, Hunter-Clyde, and the PEI Model Forest that began the Winter Woodlot Tour; the Central Queens Wildlife Federation joined the organizing team in 2014. The site of the tour changes every year, alternating between the three watershed groups involved. The site for the Winter Woodlot Tour typically falls on privately owned agricultural and forest land, showcasing the diversity of Island resources from farming to forestry and recreational activities. Attendance has grown over the years, from roughly 400 in 2010 to over 1,200 in 2017. This annual event is intended to give Islanders a taste of what our forests can do for us, both as a sustainable resource and an important part of our Island environment.

Come Join Us For An Action Packed Day Outside!

Strathgartney Equestrian Park

18 Strathgartney Rd, Bonshaw, PEI

Feb 9th, 2019   9:00 am – 1:00 pm

Strathgartney Equestrian Park is located in the West River Watershed. This hilly area has a rich natural history encompassing fields and forests, streams and rivers, diverse wildlife habitats and multi-use recreational trails.

Fun and family-friendly activities include:                                          

.             snowshoeing

.           sleigh rides

.           rope ladders and climbing course from Scouts Canada

.           making maple syrup and more

Information stations along the wooded trails will feature:

.             winter wildlife

.             plants and trees of the Acadian Forest

.             private woodlot management

.             watershed management and stream restoration

.             forest-based products and woodworking

This annual event is intended to give everyone a taste of what public and private forests provide as a economic resource and as an important part of our Island environment. There is no charge to attend and there will be heated warming tents and as always, free hot cider.

For more information, visit Facebook: PEI Winter Woodlot Tour or                    

                                                                           https://infopeiwinterwoodl.wixsite.com/winterwoodlottour

INDUSTRY OUTLOOK

*Note: The price locations provided below are only a summary and it is recommended that woodlot owners should ensure they are receiving fair prices for any forest products sold from woodlot transactions.

PRICES SUMMARY – New Brunswick

Source: http://www.snbwc.ca/snbwood/markets/SPEC001.htm

PRICES SUMMARY – Nova Scotia

Source: http://hchaynesnovascotiaprices.blogspot.ca/

ASSOCIATION HAPPENINGS

Annual General Meeting

Planning is underway by your PEIWOA Board for the Annual General Meeting 27 April 2019 at Milton Community Hall – 7 New Glasgow Road (intersection of Rte. 7 and Rte. 224)

We planning to have a comprehensive conference with speakers from various sectors of the forest industry in the Maritimes.

CONTACT

John Rowe – Chair                 Cell Phone: 902-940-1933

rowe@pei.sympatico.ca or peiwoodlotowners@gmail.com             Website: www.peiwoa.ca/

Facebook: PEI Woodlot Owners Association

https://www.facebook.com/PEI-Woodlot-Owners-Association-245012399166879/

Thank you on behalf of the board of the Prince Edward Island Woodlot Owners Association (PEIWOA) for your support. The board continues to represent your interests to the government and Industry to add resources for you to manage your woodlots.  Your continued support will enable the PEIWOA to grow and move forward. The simplest way to provide support is to renew your membership. The regular annual fee is $25.00 or you can opt for a 2 year membership for $40.00.

PEI Federation of Agriculture members can join for 2 years for $20.00.

 

Your prompt response will allow the board to plan events to meet your needs in future years. Please also encourage other woodlot owners to join so we can help even more people to add value to their woodlands.

 

Check out our Facebook page (PEI Woodlot Owners Association) and our website (http://www.peiwoa.ca/) for current and upcoming events.

 

Sincerely,

James MacDonald

Membership Secretary PEIWOA

 

YOU CAN MAKE PAYMENT VIA Interac©payment or SEND YOUR CHEQUE TO:

  

   PEI WOODLOT OWNERS ASSN.

81 PRINCE STREET,

CHARLOTTETOWN C1A 4R3

 

 

Name: ______________________________________     I have Woodlots in Kings County  (   )

Queens County (   )

Address:_________________________________                                     Prince County  (   )

 

___________________________________________       I am interested in being a director (   )                        

 

Phone: ________________________________                 PAYMENT $25   1year (     ) $40   2 year (   )

 

Email: __________________________________

 

(Office use only   date received _____________ date receipt issued ______________ Date Membership card issued ____________)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEWSLETTER INTRODUCTION

Welcome to first edition of the Prince Edward Island Woodlot Owners Association

(PEIWOA) 2019 Newsletter. The intent of these quarterly newsletters is to provide PEIWOA members with a summary of forestry and forest-related issues, opportunities, and happenings throughout PEI and the Atlantic region.

The PEIWOA is an Association of woodlot owners that encourages Islanders to create a more sustainable forest ecosystem and forest resource on PEI. We thank all members for supporting our initiative and hope that together we can continue to grow this group with a goal of enhancing the forest economy and forest industry of the Island. PEI woodlot owners have a large role to play on the Island and we are committed to being a voice for all concerns of members at a provincial and regional level.

PEIWOA

 

CHAIRMAN’S MESSAGE

January Report — 2019 – PEI Woodlot Owners Association

“Happy New Year” to all from the Board of Directors of the PEIWOA. Welcome to the first newsletter of 2019. We aim to publish three or four during the fiscal year and welcome articles from anyone who would like to write on a timely topic for the woodlot community.

We are in the planning stages of setting up an advisory group to work with our new Minister of Communities, Land and Environment — the Hon. Richard Brown. We hope it will include individuals from watershed groups; woodlot owners; and members from government departments like forestry and environment. There are a number of issues that we feel are important to the woodlot owners of PEI and we want to work with everyone to improve our industry and the environment.

In the month of November we were able to partner with The Climate Lab at UPEI and present a lecture by learned professor Dr. Gert-Jan Nabuurs from the Netherlands. He spoke about the European experience with developing sustainable forestry in various countries and their efforts to decrease their dependence on imported oil. He spoke about his experience with many research projects throughout Europe and North America relating to climate change, biomass production, biodiversity, and bioenergy. He made many suggestions how we here on PEI could benefit from their experience and move towards a more sustainable industry for the future.

During the month of December, we had an opportunity to meet with our Members of Parliament          — representing PEI in Ottawa – and briefed them on proposals that are now before parliament that were presented by the Canadian Federation of Woodlot Owners (CFWO) – of which we are a member. We plan to have a presence during the 2019 Winter Woodlot Tour which will be held the second Saturday in February – weather permitting. Please find the details elsewhere in this newsletter and plan to join us — if possible.

Please renew your membership at your earliest convenience — either online or by mail – and continue to promote our association to your friends and neighbors and fellow woodlot owners. We are always looking for members who would like to volunteer to serve on the Board. Don’t hesitate to get involved; the future of woodland on PEI is in your hands.   John J. Rowe; Chairman — PEIWOA

Chairman:  John J. Rowe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BOOK REVIEWS

I recently enjoyed reading this little book and believe many woodlot owners will too. Below are some excerpts from two summaries on the web to give you its flavour. It is available by request from our wonderful local PEI public libraries. Kathy Stuart, Board Member PEIWOA

________________________________________________________________________________

 

The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate—Discoveries from a Secret World

 

Peter Wohlleben, 2015 (2016, U.S. printing)

Greystone Books 288 pp.

ISBN-13: 9781771642484

Summary from: http://www.litlovers.com/reading-guides/fiction/10926-hiddenlife-of-trees-wohlleben?showall=1

 

Are trees social beings?

In this international bestseller, forester and author Peter Wohlleben convincingly makes the case that, yes, the forest is a social network.

He draws on groundbreaking scientific discoveries to describe how trees are like human families: tree parents live together with their children, communicate with them, support them as they grow, share nutrients with those who are sick or struggling, and even warn each other of impending dangers.

Wohlleben also shares his deep love of woods and forests, explaining the amazing processes of life, death, and regeneration he has observed in his woodland.

 

After learning about the complex life of trees, a walk in the woods will never be the same again.”

Summary from: http://www.supersummary.com/the-hidden-life-of-trees/summary/

“Subtitled What They Feel, How They Communicate, his book analyzes the ways in which trees are deeply interlinked and exhibit behaviors that can be thought of in anthropomorphic terms. The science of tree connectivity shows that they are able to distinguish their own species from others – and respond differently depending on neighbor tree identity. After explaining tree communication,

Wohlleben delves into the complex eco-systems of forests.

The rest of Wohllebenʼs book explains how he uses his newfound knowledge to manage the forest in the Eifel Mount1ins of western Germany where he lives.

 

Heavy machinery is no longer allowed, and neither are the rigid rows of planted trees promoted by his original training. Instead, he has put in place programs such as “renting” large old trees as tombstone memorials where mourners can deposit the ashes of their loved ones – 1 way of generating income from the forest without actu1lly cutting down any trees. Keeping trees in place also prevents soil

erosion and instead generates increasingly rich and fertile topsoil year after year.

What is most impressive is that no matter how radical Wohllebenʼs claims about tree intelligence and ability to feel pain and communicate with other trees is, his writing almost never errs on the side of sentimentality. Instead, his book aptly compares trees – the oldest living organisms on earth – to elephants, another long-lived and surprisingly sentient creature. He argues that it is only sensible to

limit wood consumption, change how we treat the forests we have, and rethink our concept of trees as inanimate objects.”

 

Letter to PEI Members of Parliament                                                                                                          November 2018

 

Three Federal issues of concern to woodlot owners in Prince Edward Island on which we would welcome your support

 

An exemption for lumber from private forest sawlogs in the Softwood Lumber Agreement

As sellers of sawlogs, woodlot owners hope for a positive resolution of the SLA dispute. We are experiencing price reductions and fear that the real risk of sawmill closures could be even more damaging. Lumber from private forest timber is not an issue for the Americans: their domestic timber market is dominated by private forest sawlogs, and the unrestricted flow of sawlogs across the border, which is the case in all provinces but British Columbia, has been viewed by them in the past as a positive attribute. Verification of the origin of an individual sawmill’s sawlog supply is no more complicated than the chain of custody systems used in forest certification. An exemption would relieve the “collateral damage” being experienced by many thousands of woodlot owners and benefit the sawmills to whom we sell.

 

Through the Canadian Federation of Woodlot Owners (CFWO), we have had good communication with the SLA negotiating team at Global Affairs Canada. At a meeting with them on Sept. 19, 2018 we were assured that our request for an exemption would be on the table when negotiations resume.

 

A Personal Silviculture Savings and Investment Plan

Proper forest management of woodlots involves a disconnect between years when planting and thinning should be done, and years when harvesting is appropriate. This disconnect is accentuated after natural disasters or insect and disease outbreaks. In order to recover at least some value from the silviculture investments of previous decades, a woodlot owner or license holder must desperately try to salvage as much damaged timber as possible before decay makes it unsaleable. The resulting spike in revenue has significant income tax implications. The disconnect between revenue from sale of timber and silviculture expenses is unlike the circumstances faced by other small businesses. Provisions exists in Income Tax policy for carrying back or forward a portion of the costs of planting and thinning, but these are limited. This limited ability to deduct expenses from revenue is a major disincentive to increased silviculture and reforestation.

 

We have proposed the “Personal Silviculture Savings and Investment Plan” (PSSIP) as a solution. Revenue from harvests could be deposited in a registered account similar in structure to an RRSP. Principle and interest would be withdrawn when planting and thinning are required on the woodlot. Appropriate administrative guidelines for PSSIP’s have been discussed for several years with officials from the Dept of Finance and the CRA, most recently on November 2. We believe there are no practical or technical impediments to our proposal. If PSSIP’s become a tool available to woodlot owners and license holders, they will provide a big incentive for more tree planting and silviculture. The result will be broad benefits for rural development and climate change mitigation; increased timber supplies will strengthen the competitiveness of Canada’s forest industry.

 

A national silviculture and tree planting program

In the Pan Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change in December 2015, we were pleased to see recognition of the importance of our efforts to manage our forests.

We work in our forests on a regular basis, so we see the damage being done to forests by extreme weather and increasing insect and disease outbreaks. We also see how our silviculture and tree planting work increases the growth and health of forests. The Framework recognizes the high potential contribution of increased silviculture and tree planting in the fight against climate change.

We are committed to increasing our existing silviculture and tree planting efforts. This will include avoiding deforestation, reforesting previously denuded land, and regenerating forests subjected to catastrophic events. For us to do so, the economics must make sense. Silviculture and tree planting cost money. The return on these investments comes in the form of revenue when the trees are harvested. That is normally a matter of 20-35 years in the case of pre-commercial thinning and 50 to 60 years when trees are planted. In recognition of the very long-term nature of silviculture and tree-planting investments, and of the broad public benefits from these investments, governments have often shared the cost with woodlot owners. This was the case with the FRDA’s (Federal-provincial Resource Development Agreements) of the 1980’s and ’90’s, and in all provincially funded programs currently in existence (Québec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island). Owner contribution has always been set at 10% of the total cost (cash or in kind) because it makes no financial sense for owners to invest more than that. It does make sense for governments to contribute 90% of the costs because of the large benefits to society as a whole:

  • rural employment (silviculture and logging contractors),
  • industrial timber supply (mill employment, spinoff employment)
  • environmental benefits (water, biodiversity, carbon: except in some exceptional cases, markets don’t pay for these goods and services)

In addition to the 10% contribution to direct costs, owners are also indirectly contributing the general costs associated with property ownership (taxes, insurance, boundary line maintenance, regular inspections) In a proportion of cases, there is a measurable opportunity cost associated with silviculture, and especially planting of marginal farmland, e.g. revenue foregone from rent for hay production or grazing.

 

In response to the Pan-Canadian Framework, seven provincial woodlot owner associations proposed silviculture and tree planting programs grouped under the title: “Mobilizing Canadian Private Forest Owners to Fight Climate Change” which we submitted to the ECCC portal in July 2016. In many cases these proposals will augment existing provincial programs already in place, and in all cases, associations are in active discussions with their respective provincial government authorities to ensure provincial government involvement. The proposals involve a mix of silviculture and tree planting tailored to the specific conditions in each province.

 

These proposals will contribute to Canada’s efforts to fight climate change in five ways:

  • As forest growth is increased through silviculture and tree planting, carbon will be taken up from the atmosphere for long-term storage.
  • As this increased forest growth contributes to an increase in sustainable production of timber in the medium and long term, the lumber used in building construction, furniture and other long-term wood usage will add to the long-term storage of carbon.
  • Increased use of wood for construction and household goods will reduce the Green House Gas emissions from the production of concrete and steel that would otherwise have been used in those buildings and goods.
  • The program as proposed in July 2016 will allow several tens of thousands of Canadians to make a concrete and meaningful contribution to fighting climate change, and in a way, which carries a positive benefit for rural economic development; the trade-offs between the environment and the economy that are frequently encountered in actions related to fighting climate change are avoided.
  • Public awareness of the critical role of forests in fighting climate change will be increased with field days organized by the associations near urban centers.We were again very pleased when the Low Carbon Economy Fund was announced in June 2017 to see that forestry (with agriculture) was identified as one of three priority areas for support by the Fund. We submitted an Expression of Interest in May 2018 for the Challenge portion of the Fund and received an invitation to submit a detailed proposal for a three-year proposal in August. Unfortunately, conditions attached to the invitation have made it impossible for us to proceed: because woodlots are considered to be profit making businesses, we would be eligible for 25% Federal support (not 40% for non-profit organizations), and we would be required to identify all 7000 participants in the application. Each of these conditions is insurmountable.We see two possible routes that would make a national tree planting program a reality in 2019:
  • Additional money be made available to the provincial government “Leadership” portion of the

 

    1.        Fund where the two conditions would not apply.
  • Establish a budget for a national program separate from the Fund and under Natural 

 

  1. We have proposed two ways in which the Federal government can support our efforts to grow more trees and healthier forests. If the Personal Silviculture Savings and Investment Plan, and a national silviculture and tree planting program seems like good ideas to you, please help us make them happen.
  2.        Resources Canada

 

PEI Woodlot Owners Association (PEIWOA) Chainsaw Training Program

Objective: The project is intended to bring Chainsaw training to interested individuals on PEI. The goal is to promote a safe working environment and sustainable forest management in the forested woodlots of PEI. The PEIWOA want to establish a training program where they can offer training to their members and individuals who want to work in their woodlots but do not have the training. This project will support the forest industry and work toward training individuals with skills needed to be employable to contractors and supporting the forest management needs of the woodlot owners of PEI.

The desire to have chainsaw training available for all Islanders is an important objective of the PEIWOA. The use of chainsaws in PEI has remained consistent and the continual support to Forest contractors, Watershed Groups and the Agriculture community has lessened over the years.

The location of the training courses will be centered in where individuals have expressed interest in the course.

Project Activities: Each participant will be given the web site address to access the Manual: The Forest Professional which is the document endorsed by the Atlantic Provinces Occupational Health and Safety Agencies. This manual is intended to represent acceptable Industry practices and is used as a resource for the training.

The project will offer in class instruction to promote the safety and well-being of all persons when using a chainsaw by offering training in chainsaw safety, maintenance use and cutting techniques. Participants will be required to work on a chainsaw and understand how it works and to develop the skill needed to demonstrate how to operate the chainsaw. A certificate will be presented when this is accomplished by each participant.

Each participant will be evaluated on:

Work site assessment: includes assessment of work area, requirements for workplace safety, and pre-cut site evaluation.

Operation of Chainsaw: includes safety equipment for operator (PPE), Safety features on chainsaw, maintenance of chainsaw and procedures for starting the chainsaw.

Cutting procedures: includes procedure for felling trees, for directional felling, for delimbing trees, for bucking trees and for leaning or lodged trees.

The expectation of the training program is for all participants to partake in classroom activities and to physically demonstrate the skills required. Each participant will leave the course with the ability to operate a chainsaw as an employee or woodlot owner. Each participant will learn to respect, to control the power, make sound decisions and use good judgement while using a chainsaw.

Success can be measured by the skill level and the knowledge that is gained through course evaluations. The increase in safety awareness will control the risks and reduce the cause of accidents and near misses. The knowledge of how you create a safe work environment will promote an increase in forest management activities.

The Potential Environmental impacts will be the improvement to the overall health of woodlots on PEI. There will be changes to woodlots because of work implemented as a result of more trained workers. Stands that will have forest management done can expect to experience a change in plant diversity and animal activity.

 

Edible Tree Canada program      Interested in edible nut and fruit trees? There is a tree Canada edible tree program that is designed to help the public learn more about agro-forestry and have access to such sites.      Applicants must provide a full description of their tree planting project and its benefits to the local community. The proposed project should take place on a public site that is accessible to the community. Trees should be able to grow in perpetuity, allowing for the longevity of the positive impacts of the project. Tangible and measurable goals should be emphasized throughout the proposal reflecting the needs of the community and how they will benefit from the trees. An educational component to engage community members with the project is also recommended.

When considering planting activities, please keep in mind that planting seasons are spring 2019 (May 1st – June 30th) and Fall 2019 (September 1st – October 31st). The number of trees intended for the project should be based on the available space of the site and the grant amount ($3,500).

Community Engagement:

Long-term engagement with the project is a primary objective of the program. Please include an explanation of how the proposed project will engage with the local community and provide a plan for how members will maintain their involvement in the project over time.

Technical Expertise and maintenance:

The project must be supported by someone with technical expertise to guide the applicant through its efforts. It is important to develop a maintenance plan for the harvest and to ensure the survival of the trees. Also, evaluation criteria should be elaborated in order to monitor the success of the project over the years.

Promotion and Event:

A planting activity and recognition event is required for the project. Please include a proposed date and description of an event where you will acknowledge the efforts of your community as well as the sponsors that have made your project possible. Funding of the grant is contingent on the applicant hosting a recognition event.

To help you determine your species selection and cost per tree, contact Jesse Argent at Havenloft Tree Nursery. (902) 218-3034, havnelofttreenursery@gmail.com.

Jesse can help you come up with an agroforestry plan, and go over the application with you. As well as bring technical expertise on the application and installment

 

The Winter Woodlot Tour 2019

The Official tour began in 2010, evolving from events for woodlot owners organized by the PEI Model Forest (Healthy Forests, Healthy Communities) Program. It was Wheatley River, Hunter-Clyde, and the PEI Model Forest that began the Winter Woodlot Tour; the Central Queens Wildlife Federation joined the organizing team in 2014. The site of the tour changes every year, alternating between the three watershed groups involved. The site for the Winter Woodlot Tour typically falls on privately owned agricultural and forest land, showcasing the diversity of Island resources from farming to forestry and recreational activities. Attendance has grown over the years, from roughly 400 in 2010 to over 1,200 in 2017. This annual event is intended to give Islanders a taste of what our forests can do for us, both as a sustainable resource and an important part of our Island environment.

Come Join Us For An Action Packed Day Outside!

Strathgartney Equestrian Park

18 Strathgartney Rd, Bonshaw, PEI

Feb 9th, 2019   9:00 am – 1:00 pm

Strathgartney Equestrian Park is located in the West River Watershed. This hilly area has a rich natural history encompassing fields and forests, streams and rivers, diverse wildlife habitats and multi-use recreational trails.

Fun and family-friendly activities include:                                          

.             snowshoeing

.           sleigh rides

.           rope ladders and climbing course from Scouts Canada

.           making maple syrup and more

Information stations along the wooded trails will feature:

.             winter wildlife

.             plants and trees of the Acadian Forest

.             private woodlot management

.             watershed management and stream restoration

.             forest-based products and woodworking

This annual event is intended to give everyone a taste of what public and private forests provide as a economic resource and as an important part of our Island environment. There is no charge to attend and there will be heated warming tents and as always, free hot cider.

For more information, visit Facebook: PEI Winter Woodlot Tour or                    

                                                                           https://infopeiwinterwoodl.wixsite.com/winterwoodlottour

INDUSTRY OUTLOOK

*Note: The price locations provided below are only a summary and it is recommended that woodlot owners should ensure they are receiving fair prices for any forest products sold from woodlot transactions.

PRICES SUMMARY – New Brunswick

Source: http://www.snbwc.ca/snbwood/markets/SPEC001.htm

PRICES SUMMARY – Nova Scotia

Source: http://hchaynesnovascotiaprices.blogspot.ca/

ASSOCIATION HAPPENINGS

Annual General Meeting

Planning is underway by your PEIWOA Board for the Annual General Meeting 27 April 2019 at Milton Community Hall – 7 New Glasgow Road (intersection of Rte. 7 and Rte. 224)

We planning to have a comprehensive conference with speakers from various sectors of the forest industry in the Maritimes.

CONTACT

John Rowe – Chair                 Cell Phone: 902-940-1933

rowe@pei.sympatico.ca or peiwoodlotowners@gmail.com             Website: www.peiwoa.ca/

Facebook: PEI Woodlot Owners Association

https://www.facebook.com/PEI-Woodlot-Owners-Association-245012399166879/

Thank you on behalf of the board of the Prince Edward Island Woodlot Owners Association (PEIWOA) for your support. The board continues to represent your interests to the government and Industry to add resources for you to manage your woodlots.  Your continued support will enable the PEIWOA to grow and move forward. The simplest way to provide support is to renew your membership. The regular annual fee is $25.00 or you can opt for a 2 year membership for $40.00.

PEI Federation of Agriculture members can join for 2 years for $20.00.

 

Your prompt response will allow the board to plan events to meet your needs in future years. Please also encourage other woodlot owners to join so we can help even more people to add value to their woodlands.

 

Check out our Facebook page (PEI Woodlot Owners Association) and our website (http://www.peiwoa.ca/) for current and upcoming events.

 

Sincerely,

James MacDonald

Membership Secretary PEIWOA

 

YOU CAN MAKE PAYMENT VIA Interac©payment or SEND YOUR CHEQUE TO:

  

   PEI WOODLOT OWNERS ASSN.

81 PRINCE STREET,

CHARLOTTETOWN C1A 4R3

 

 

Name: ______________________________________     I have Woodlots in Kings County  (   )

Queens County (   )

Address:_________________________________                                     Prince County  (   )

 

___________________________________________       I am interested in being a director (   )                        

 

Phone: ________________________________                 PAYMENT $25   1year (     ) $40   2 year (   )

 

Email: __________________________________

 

(Office use only   date received _____________ date receipt issued ______________ Date Membership card issued ____________)